Monthly Archives: October 2016

Using Pre-Session Data to Confirm Levels

 

The following text and image were shared recently through both the YTC facebook and twitter pages.

  • My first action on Monday mornings upon opening my charting platform…

 

My first action on Monday mornings upon opening my charting platform...

Actually, it's one of the first things I do every day.

This is the key part we're discussing today:

Using pre-session data to confirm levels

Let's stick with the same timeframe but move forward to the market open at 09:30am.

Using pre-session data to confirm levels

Sometimes analysis of pre-session data offers nothing at all to confirm the relevance of previous session levels.

Sometimes it will allow us to invalidate these levels, when we see price slice through them with absolutely no reaction at all.

And sometimes, like in this case, it helps to validate a level as being still "potentially" significant.

Friday's low will be on my mind as I commence trading today.

Let's see how the opening sequences played out on the trading timeframe.

Using pre-session data to confirm levels

Using pre-session data to confirm levels

(If you're not sure what I'm looking for, see here to find out how I trade!)

Using pre-session data to confirm levels

Using pre-session data to confirm levels

Sometimes analysis of pre-session data offers nothing at all to confirm the relevance of previous session levels.

Sometimes it will allow us to invalidate these levels, when we see price slice through them with absolutely no reaction at all.

And sometimes, like in this case, it helps to validate a level as being still "potentially" significant.

If you prefer to trade with RTH data (pit session data) in order to take advantage of opening gaps, that is absolutely fine.

But at least take a quick look at the ETH data (overnight). See where it has traded with respect to the prior day. Where did it find movement quite easy. And where did it find did it find support or resistance.

This might just provide important information that can help once the opening bell has rung and trading has commenced.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

I Was Wrong Again

 

You won't be successful as a trader until you're comfortable with the idea of being wrong.

I'm wrong EVERY DAY.

Numerous times.

I'm ok with that.

And that's part of why I'm successful.

Trading success requires that you accept and understand that success...

comes over a series of trades.

Individual trades are irrelevant.

You will be wrong!

I was wrong again.

Part of the position was stopped out at -2.0 points; the rest was at -2.25 points.

Whatever!!!

I step aside.

I regroup.

And I return and do it right.

Because, you know what? One trade does not define the success or failure of my trading business.

A trading edge plays out over a SERIES OF TRADES.

Often!

It took me two more trades to get back in front.

One that almost did it… it's just the commissions that kept me in slight drawdown.

Accept it. And...

What was I saying before about "right but mismanaged"?

Thankfully there was opportunity to re-enter!

learn to profit despite your imperfection in decision making and trade execution.

Yep… playing The Fourth Principle would have worked out so much better.

But instead, I'm left with a whole lot of IMPERFECT DECISION MAKING!!!

And yet… that's reality.

I'd love to show you only the "perfect" trade sequences.

But that would be doing you a disservice.

Reality is sometimes messy. You need to accept that.

And you need to learn to profit DESPITE your imperfection.

So if you find yourself overly frustrated after a trade loss, and unable to get back in while the premise is still valid, ask yourself why?

Do you not believe in your edge?

Do you not believe in your ability to trade your edge?

Are you trading too much size, such that a single loss actually HURTS?

Or have you not yet truly understood and accepted the long-term nature of this business (aiming for positive results over a series of trades rather than on every single trade)?

You won't be successful as a trader until you're comfortable with the idea of being wrong.

I'm wrong EVERY DAY.

Numerous times.

I'm ok with that.

And that's part of why I'm successful.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Wait till the Reversal Trader is Trapped

 

I am quite a fan of Al Brooks' first book, "Reading Price Charts Bar by Bar", despite the fact that we trade very differently.

Out of close to 400 pages, there is the one idea which has stuck with me more than any other. From page 384:

"Countertrend setups in strong trends almost always fail and become great With Trend setups…"

The idea is simple.

In a strong trend you will find all manner of reasons to suspect that the trend is ready for reversal. And you'll find yourself easily tempted to enter counter-trend.

But more often than not, it's a trap.

When you feel this strong desire to trade counter-trend, do NOT trade. Be comforted by the fact that others will notice it as well. And that they'll enter.

Then watch their position, waiting patiently until they're trapped.

The failure of their counter-trend position will often provide a great entry for you, back in the with-trend direction.

Those who trade the YTC Price Action Trader methodology will be very familiar with this concept – timing our entry off the failure of "the other trader".

This concept came to mind on Tuesday, as I felt a strong desire to enter counter-trend against a strong bearish trend in NQ.

Let's look at the charts.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Actually, I'm not happy with the exit decisions. But that's something for me to explore in my trade review process.

In terms of setup and entry… I love this one.

"Countertrend setups in strong trends almost always fail and become great With Trend setups…"

Keep this in mind next time the price bars scream out for you to fade a strong trend.

Is it actually a trap?

And is better opportunity perhaps available if you stand aside and wait for the "other traders" to be caught?

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Fighting to Regain Losses

 

I had an interesting email exchange with a trader a couple of weeks ago, who is struggling with occasional massive losses.

email excerpts

email excerpts

I've had the opportunity to speak to a LOT of traders over the last 8 years of writing these articles. You'd be surprised at how common this problem is.

We discussed several options to investigate further, related to money and risk management, strategy, and of course psychology.

What I wanted to share with you all today though, was just one simple concept that might help, should you ever find yourself suffering from a similar problem.

It's just a slight shift in mindset. It may not be easy. It certainly won't be the full solution. But it could well play a part in overcoming the problem.

Here is what is happening right now:

The current plan

I get it.

Losing sucks. We don't want to lose.

And even more than losing, we don't want to admit we were wrong.

So we fight! We double down on our earlier decision, hoping, wishing and praying that the market will turn. Just enough to get us back to breakeven.

There is a problem though.

IT'S NOT WORKING.

You said that yourself!

But it's not working!

Sure, sometimes it will work out just fine, but it's only a matter of time till the market provides another extended drawdown which takes you out of the game.

Your current money and risk management plan provides you with NO EDGE.

And here's a key part of the problem:

Here is part of the reason why...

Let's repeat that for effect!

  • When you FIGHT to get back to breakeven, you're doing so at a time when the market environment is NOT working in your favour.

 

Seriously!

You're fighting against a strong and persistent trend!

I'm not saying don't fight. But if you're going to fight to get back to breakeven, let's see if we can do it a bit smarter. Let's rethink this concept.

Let's break the current plan into three stages.

The current plan (in stages)

What if we planned our fight differently?

A better plan

Use HOPE as the trigger.

Any time you find yourself HOPING that an extra "unplanned" entry might just help you get out at breakeven… EXIT.

Take some time out to clear your mind.

And resume the fight at a time and place when the market movement and price conditions are IN YOUR FAVOUR.

Don't make this game any harder than it needs to be. Fight to regain losses at a time and place of YOUR CHOOSING.

It's the same challenge; taking a drawdown back to breakeven and maybe even positive territory. But you're doing so when the odds are more in your favour.

And even if four out of five times the market would have got you out at breakeven, had you just entered one more time, ignore it. Remind yourself that averaging down has proven to have NO EDGE. Because the fifth time will not only blow out to a huge loss, but will also take away all these previous gains.

If you're going to fight to regain losses… do so at a time and place of YOUR CHOOSING.

Step aside. Clear your mind. And resume the fight at a time and place when the market movement and price conditions are IN YOUR FAVOUR.

It's just a slight shift in mindset. But it can make a really big difference.

Good luck,

Lance Beggs

 

PS. A pro-trader will NEVER EVER let a single trade, or a sequence of trades, take them out of the game. Always, before any other goal, your priority is to survive to trade another day. If your current money management plan involves adding to positions just based out of hope and fear, then your money management plan sucks. Fix it. Or you're unlikely to last long in this business.