Yearly Archives: 2017

Start Your Session With IF-THEN Scenarios

 

Last Sunday I shared one of my old articles via social media.

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Click on the image, or this link here, if you wish to read the old article.

This is such an important part of my pre-session preparation.

Why?

It simply aims to get my session off to a good start – so very important for maintaining an effective mindset throughout the trading day.

This is not prediction. This is simply forward planning… developing “IF-THEN” scenarios based upon your assessment of the likely future price action.

If your “read” of price movement proves correct, you will have trade opportunity. If it proves incorrect, you stand aside and reassess.

This will ensure your actions in the market are pre-considered and your trades only occur when the market has confirmed your expectations.

And you will be less likely to be caught in a trap through impulsive reaction to unexpected price movement.

NOTE: What I am doing here with my IF-THEN analysis is NOT the same as the Game Planning / Hypos that you see other traders doing. Typically they're looking at much higher timeframes or Market/Volume Profile tools to determine a likely hypothesis for the WHOLE DAY.

I'm looking at the trading timeframe and where the market opens with respect to key levels, and assessing likely movement for the OPENING FEW PRICE SWINGS ONLY.

There is of course nothing to stop you using both. Whole session, higher-timeframe game planning plus opening sequence trading-timeframe IF-THEN scenarios.

It's just important here for me to point out the difference.

These are not meant to define the whole session. They just aim to get you off to a good start.

And from there, the picture keeps updating bar by bar in accordance with the YTC Six Principles of Future Trend Projection.

Anyway, let's look at my opening IF-THEN scenarios for the week to date, in the emini-NASDAQ (NQ) market:

Monday – 13th February 2017

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Tuesday – 14th February 2017

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Wednesday – 15th February 2017

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Thursday – 16th February 2017

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

So as we head towards the open on Friday, why not consider creating your own IF-THEN statements for the opening couple of price swings.

They won't always be right.

But when they are, it means that your actions in the market are pre-considered and your trades only occur when the market "makes sense".

And when the market offers something different, you simply stand aside and reassess.

It's all about getting your session off to the best start possible, through minimising emotional reaction to surprising and unexpected price movement.

Give it a try. You may just like the idea.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

A BOF Trade with Many YTC Concepts

 

Let's look over a trade I particularly like, from earlier this week.

It's nothing special in terms of returns. But it took an otherwise dull session from breakeven into profits.

And it displays many of the concepts that we have discussed here in the newsletter over the last few years.

So I particularly like this one. And I thought it's a good one to share to reinforce some of these key lessons.

The trade is a Breakout Failure trade following price interaction with the Prior Day's High resistance.

Breakout Failure Review 

Let's see what I liked about this trade…

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review 

Let's see the outcome…

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

 

Today I want to share with you some examples of the work done by Johnny, as he learns to read and trade the charts as taught in the YTC Price Action Trader ebook series.

Chapter 17 of Volume 5 of the ebook series provides a graduated development plan.

Before you trade live you must prove success on the sim.

And before you trade on the sim, you must ensure complete understanding of the analysis and trade concepts via historical chart study.

Johnny is working through that first stage, through detailed study of prior sessions in his chosen market (YM) and timeframe (3 minute TTF, 1 minute LTF).

His work so far is of the HIGHEST STANDARD. So much so that I absolutely had to seek permission to share it.

If you're just starting out in your journey as well, whether with my strategy or with one you developed yourself, set Johnny's work as the benchmark that you try to also achieve.

Imagine doing this for 100 prior sessions, before you even hit the sim. Yes, there are completely new challenges at the hard, right hand edge of the screen. But you'll be tackling those challenges with complete confidence in knowing what it is you're looking for. And more importantly, why!

The following charts have been compressed in size in order to fit on the webpage. If you click each image it will open a larger copy in a new browser window.

You'll note that they all examine the exact same price sequence, from a number of different perspectives – (a) Trend Assessment, (b) Clues and Observations, (c) Changes in Sentiment, (d) Changes in Structure, and (e) Setup Areas.

I hope you get great value out of this. If it inspires even just one of you to improve the quality of your own learning, this will have been a massive success. Thanks Johnny!

Enjoy…

 

TREND

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study 

CLUES AND OBSERVATIONS

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

CHANGES IN SENTIMENT

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

CHANGES IN STRUCTURE

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

SETUP AREAS

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

LOWER TIMEFRAME CHARTS  (note: there is some overlap from one chart to the next)

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Leaning Your Entry Against Other Price Action

 

Sometimes you're just not 100% sure.

Not quite ready to pull the trigger.

At these times it's best to wait.

Remember this – "If I could only take one trade this hour, would I be happy to make it this one? If not, pass."

Clearly if you're hesitating then the trade does not meet this criteria.

Let it pass.

And maybe… just maybe… the next couple of price bars will offer up something that makes the decision easier.

Like this…

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

If I'm unsure about a trade then I'm happy to pass.

If I miss the trade, so be it. I don't have to take every trade. I plan to trade for several more decades. My career is unlikely to be defined by this one potential trade. Let it go. And prepare for the next.

But sometimes just another few candles is all it takes. If it offers some price action structure to lean against, I'll attack that opportunity. And manage whatever follows.

Consider watching for this in your charts.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

PS. The following were some earlier articles "loosely related" to this idea, although exploring the concept on the Trading Timeframe chart rather than the Lower Timeframe chart. Either way, it's all about letting the market turn first and then entering on a slight retest, with other price action at your back. Enjoy…

 


 

It is NOT your job to win on any particular trade!

 

Before you can consistently win, you're going to have to learn how to lose really well.

That is…

  • Completely accepting losses as a normal part of the game.
  • And containing the damage to pre-accepted limits.

 

This has been one of my favourite themes of the last year or so. Let's go over it one more time.

It really is that important!

Here's an extract from an email discussion I had on Wednesday with another trader in response to a really challenging sequence of price action.

(5) This point may not be a problem for you. You might understand it completely. But in my experience, while the vast majority of "developing" traders say they do understand this, the reality is that very few traders actually do REALLY GET it at a deeper level. Their actions and decisions prove they don't get it. And often when I'm sent an email asking "why didn't this trade win", it's obvious that this is the case – they don't really understand the game.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is your job to identify opportunity that contains edge. And to take it and manage it well. Some will win. Some will lose.

Our aim is not to profit on any particular trade. But rather to profit over a series of trades.

Feel free to define a "series of trades" based upon whatever number you consider provides a sufficient sample size. For the sake of this email, let's assume it's 20 trades, which is the absolute minimum I'd consider as sufficient.

So we aim to profit over 20 trade groupings. Within each group there will be some winners. There will be some losers. Both are absolutely fine. They're meant to be there.

And in fact, there will likely be strings of losers, from times when either the market environment was not optimal. Or our decision making was suboptimal.

Again, that is completely normal.

So our decision making pre-entry should be in confirming that (a) the trade idea has edge, and (b) regardless of whether it wins or loses, it's a trade that we really want contributing to our 20 trade sample.

And during the trade management stage, at the forefront of our mind is always the thought about whether or not we still want this contributing to our 20 trade sample.

The reason for bringing this up, is because the interaction with S/R that you have provided in your example, is rather messy. We don't know that will be the case until after the fact, when we can view the charts with the benefit of hindsight. But it's not unusual in messy price sequences to end up with two, or maybe even three losses or scratched trades. This is completely normal. And it should be absorbed within the 20 trade sample, with other better sequences providing sufficient profits to overcome them.

This is also why I will typically only limit myself to two attempts at a trade idea. Three at most (if the prior losses are less than 1R each). If after these 2-3 attempts, I've not captured a good entry, then I'm clearly not reading the market well. Stand aside. And wait for the structure to change. If one further entry would have been sufficient to capture the planned move, and it now occurs without me, so be it. It wasn't mine to catch. Let it go and move on to the next.

 This is VERY IMPORTANT. In fact, key to success. ALWAYS be thinking about the larger sample of trades. Is the current trade one you want contributing to the sample? And if it's one of the losers, keep it small so that it can be easily overcome. And if it's one of the winners, work to take as much out of it as you can.

 

There is no need to review the sequence from that email.

Let's instead look at a few trades in the first hour on Tuesday.

Trades in which there is nothing particularly special. They're just normal run-of-the-mill trades.

Some lose. Some win.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

Let's look at the two losses…

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

Here's the plan:

KEEP THE LOSSES SMALL.

CONTAIN THE DAMAGE.

SO THAT IT ONLY TAKES ONE OR TWO SMALL WINNERS TO MORE THAN MAKE UP FOR THEM.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

Before you can consistently win, you're going to have to learn how to lose really well.

That is…

  • Completely accepting losses as a normal part of the game.
  • And containing the damage to pre-accepted limits.

 

Stop worrying about profiting on every single trade.

Aim instead to just manage them well.

And seek to profit over a larger SERIES of trades.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Before Making Changes to your Strategy, Ask These Questions…

 

We're one week into the new year. Are you already trying to tweak your strategy, or your trading process, based upon a bad session or two?

Before making changes to your strategy or process, ask yourself the following questions:

1. Is the change the result of deliberate analysis of past performance, in order to improve upon a recognised deficiency or to further enhance a current strength?

A Deliberate Process

2. Or is the change a result of looking at a few different indicators or settings and thinking, "This might be a good idea"?

I know it will work this time!

It better be the first one!

If not, the major problem is not with strategy, but with your growth and development process. Yes, the strategy may well need further work. But without an effective growth and development process you'll likely never find the right solution.

Let's fix it now.

First, review this article – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/dont-break-the-chain-a-simple-tool-to-improve-consistency/

We're going to use this method to try to force some consistency. But with a tracking sheet designed just for this purpose.

Right click to save a PDF copy

(Larger copy: http://www.yourtradingcoach.com/products/ebooks/consistency-tracker.pdf)

And second, commit to a better process.

Review this article – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/its-time-to-fight-to-get-to-the-next-level/

Print out the article if necessary.

And take action.

A Deliberate Process

Your trading success requires consistency in application of your plan… and an effective process for driving growth and development.

You can do it!

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs