Monthly Archives: October 2018

Order Entry Error – Again

 

I seem to average an order entry error maybe once every two months. That's not too bad considering entry is via a single click. But it's something I will continue to work at improving.

In the meantime, it's an opportunity to again present my ideas on how to best manage those times when you somehow find yourself trading in the wrong direction.

Those times when order entry gives way to confusion, as things just don't look right, and then to shock as you realise you're short when you expected to be long (or vice versa).

Common advice is to IMMEDIATELY hit the CLOSE button. Accept any loss (or bonus profit). It's not part of your edge so you have no business trading it. Then try to get back in; this time in the right direction.

If you want to do that – fine. There are no problems with this.

I prefer something a little different. Maybe the idea will appeal to you as well.

The general idea is to use your skill to make a real-time contextual risk management decision. You can do this. Your brain is better at pattern recognition than you realise.

  • Is the position in immediate threat? (ie. Is price likely to continue to move against you?)
  • If so, then exit immediately
  • If not, then see if you can actively work a better exit, or even turn it into a profitable trade.

 

Think of it this way. What percentage of your trade ideas lose?

50%, 40%, 30%?

Whatever it is, there's a reasonable chance that this trade idea could fall on the losing side.

Which means, now that you're trading in the wrong direction, you might actually be able to get a profit.

Low odds perhaps. But you've found yourself in this situation. So why not try to turn it into a positive.

Don't jump straight for the CLOSE button if there is no immediate threat.

Pause. Assess the situation. And allow yourself to make a real-time decision as to whether to close or whether to manage any further risk and opportunity.

Here's the trade idea:

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

Reference for CPB setup: YTC Price Action Trader Vol 3 Ch 4 P38

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

<image: Order entry error - and how I manage it...>

Use your skill to make a real-time contextual risk management decision.

  • Is the position in immediate threat? (ie. Is price likely to continue to move against you?)
  • If so, then exit immediately
  • If not, then see if you can actively work a better exit, or even turn it into a profitable trade.

 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

A Shift in Mindset – 2

 

Last week we discussed a common problem with new and developing traders – difficulty accepting losses as a normal part of the game.

<image: Losses are a part of the game>

And we discussed a simple idea for moving beyond this problem, through seeking profits over a larger series of trades rather than any individual trade.

You can see last week's article here if you missed it – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trader/a-shift-in-mindset/

Today, let's discuss another exercise which might help.

PAIRING WINS AND LOSSES!

Let's look at your last twenty trade results. It might be something like this.

<image: Losses are a part of the game>

This is the game. This is how your results will (typically) display over any series of trades.

The number of trades on each side will naturally vary. Sometimes you'll have more winners than losers. Other times more losers than winners.

But any series of trades will likely include both WINNERS and LOSERS.

They're a normal part of the game.

The aim then is to approach trading such that anything on the left side (losses) is small enough to easily be covered by one good trade on the right side (wins).

Let's pair them off…

<image: Losses are a part of the game>

<image: Losses are a part of the game>

<image: Losses are a part of the game>

<image: Losses are a part of the game>

Of course… if you end up with excess on the left then this sequence of trades has no edge. And you've got more work to do.

But this is the ultimate aim. A series of trades which includes both winners AND losers, in which pairing them off leaves you with an excess of winners. Achieve this consistently and YOU'VE GOT EDGE.

It might help you to carry out this exercise each weekend, creating a table with your results from the prior week. Firstly to reinforce the fact that it's ABSOLUTELY NORMAL to have both losses and wins. But secondly, to give you a feel for how much of an edge you have. Or how close you are to achieving edge.

Or… for some of you… it might help to carry out this exercise live. In real-time. As you trade each day. Add your losses to the losses column. Add your profits to the profits column. And pair them up whenever you can. The aim being to keep your losses small enough so that they are easily covered by a single win. And more importantly, achieving a confidence boost when you get a profit on the right side of the table, and have no losses available to pair it with.

Give it a try if you think it might help you visualise your "series of trades". And hopefully reduce any concern over losing trades. After all, they're just a normal part of the win/loss table and easily covered by pairing up with the next win. They're no problem at all. Take the hit. Focus. And move on.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

A Shift in Mindset

 

I love this comment in response to last week's article (see the article here if you missed it).

<image: A Shift in Mindset>

This was the trade Steve is referring to:

<image: A Shift in Mindset>

Too many traders take the loss personally. As Steve says, they're stuck in the mindset of "Aaargh, I did it again."

Their focus is on themselves and their feeling of intense injustice and frustration.

Their focus is NOT on the price movement.

And so they miss the next opportunity, which spirals them into even greater depths of despair, especially when that opportunity is back in the original direction in which they entered.

LOSSES ARE A PART OF THE GAME.

Take the hit. Refocus yourself. And move on. (Provided session loss limits are not hit, in which case you shut down for the day!)

We've talked quite a bit over the years about the fact that trading is NOT about individual trades. Instead it's a game of profiting over a SERIES of trades.

Individual trade results are irrelevant. Series of trades are what matters.

And here's the thing – every series of trades will likely contain a combination of both winners AND losers.

LOSSES ARE A PART OF THE GAME.

Take the hit. Refocus yourself. And move on.

I shared a simple concept once before, which may help create a shift in mindset for some who read it. Let's repeat the idea today.

What if you stopped trying to find winners?

<image: A Shift in Mindset>

Why is that?

Because…

<image: A Shift in Mindset>

<image: A Shift in Mindset>

It's an important difference.

A novice trader is trying to find a trade that will win.

I'm trying to find a trade that is worthy of being one in a series of twenty. 

I don't need a winner.

I place all the odds in my favour. And I take the trade.

If it's a loss, I take the hit, refocus and move on.

It's a slightly different mindset… but one with a whole lot less fear.

I want to share one more idea which might help create this shift in mindset. But this article is long enough already.

Let's continue next week.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Chasing Performance

 

Here's a little post-session exercise which may help stretch your performance to "never-before-reached" profit levels.

Pick a target just above your all-time-high for a trading session. Whatever that is – $100, $500, $1000, $5000 or more.

And ask yourself the following.

Looking at the chart for today's session, with the benefit of hindsight, how could I have achieved an all-time high in profits?

It's not about beating yourself up for having failed to reach new highs. Most days you won't reach them.

But it's about pushing yourself. Never settling for mediocrity. Always stretching to achieve more.

Look at the chart. Look at your trades.

Were there were price sequences which you failed to see? Is there some way you could you have captured them?

Were there price sequences in which you underperformed? Could you have taken more out of the move? Could you have increased size somehow? Could you have re-entered if stopped out? Could you have extended the targets or trailed price differently?

If you somehow did manage to squeeze all the profits out of your strategy that day, then ask if there were other ways could you have viewed price and profited? Operate from an assumption that there WAS some way to have achieved new all-time highs today. NOW FIND IT.

And just maybe… next time… you'll take the lessons learnt and actually push through to achieve these new levels of performance.

<image: Chasing Performance>

<image: Chasing Performance>

<image: Chasing Performance>

<image: Chasing Performance>

<image: Chasing Performance>

LWP Reference (for those who want to review the concept) – Vol 3, Ch 4, pp 72-77

<image: Chasing Performance>

<image: Chasing Performance>

<image: Chasing Performance>

<image: Chasing Performance>

Post-session:

Consider your outcome. And compare it with your all-time high.

Review the charts and find ways you could have stretched yourself to never-before achieved levels of performance.

Perhaps next time, this exercise might just help you reach the new target.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs