About: Lance Beggs

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Recent Posts by Lance Beggs

If You Suffer From Too Much Impulsive Trading…

 

The following was a social media post that I sent out just before my trading session on the 6th of February.

It was my first session following a two week holiday… and I was more than keen to get back into the markets.

If you suffer from too much impulsive trading... 

Click on the image or this link here if you wish to read the article – Patience is a Key Component of your Edge.

It was a simple reminder to myself that:

  • The real source of my edge is not in my strategy, but in ME.
  • Patience plays an important part in realising that edge.
  • And most importantly – I don't have to trade every price sequence.

 

In other words… knowing that I'm susceptible to emotional, impulsive trading when I first come back from a break, I reminded myself to slow down. And wait till I was truly in sync with the market.

As I write this it's now the 21st of February. It's the first trading day following a long weekend. I'm keen to trade. I'll be giving myself the same reminder pre-session.

And again next week. I'll be admitted to hospital next Tuesday for some very minor day surgery (nothing to worry about). But I'll likely need a day or two off trading as I recover. Again, I'll be giving myself this same reminder.

Slow down. And wait till I'm truly in sync with the market.

HOWEVER…

This is not all I do.

There is a simple "hack" which I've used for a few years now which provides exceptional help in overcoming my impulsive desire to trade.

I've thought about sharing it a few times, but to be honest it seems so obvious that I thought it would be a stupid topic for an article. My stats clearly show that readers prefer charts… and this is not a chart.

But it's so important. And such a great help. And given that I'll be applying the hack again today… I figure you should get it too.

This will be of most relevance to short timeframe day traders; those of us who "screen watch". But the general concept can be adapted for use by longer timeframe traders as well. We'll talk about that later.

Interestingly, there has been some exceptional discussion on this topic in other blogs in recent weeks. I'm not going to duplicate their advice. It's great work and you should go directly to their blogs to read their suggestions and solutions.

http://www.smbtraining.com/blog/a-solution-to-improve-your-patience-as-a-trader

http://tradingcomposure.com/traders-impulsivity/

Visualisation, meditation, mindfulness, and all the other methods discussed… they're very important and a key part of your solution. I particularly LOVE the technique provided by Dr Steenbarger, in the SMB Training link. I'll make you click to get that one! (Ha ha).

But I was surprised to see that my little impulsivity hack was not presented.

So here we go.

What is the solution? How do I reduce the likelihood of emotional, impulsive reaction to price movement?

I create a physical barrier between my desire to trade and my ability to execute.

If you suffer from too much impulsive trading...

In other words… I step back about a metre and conduct all analysis out of reach of the keyboard and mouse.

I know… right!

LAME!

No, seriously. Work with me here.

The key problem is NOT our impulsive desire to trade. It's the fact that we react to that desire by clicking the mouse and entering.

The solution is to put a barrier in place. Something that forces a break between your desire to trade and your ability to enter.

It does not need to be a massive barrier. This solution is about as small a barrier as we can get. It's simply space. And only one metre. But it's enough.

  • Step back from the keyboard and mouse.
  • Conduct your analysis.
  • When you feel that desire to trade, don't. You can't reach it. And you're not allowed to step forward. So just pause and reassess.
  • And ONLY step forward once that pause and reassessment screams out, "Yes! This is the opportunity I've been waiting for. This is an A+ setup. This does provide edge."

 

Discipline and patience are not just a function of willpower. You can create physical barriers to limit impulsive trading.

A physical barrier between your desire to trade and your ability to execute.

Just a small barrier. But just enough to have you pause and reassess.

Longer timeframe traders… clearly stepping back one metre is not likely to help you. After all, you've got a lot of time to make decisions anyway. But the same concept applies – adjust your environment to provide a barrier between decision and execution. One possible solution – conduct your analysis and trade decisions on a separate platform that does not allow execution. Once trade decisions are made and written down, open up your broker's execution platform and reassess the quality of your decisions. Only enter if they're still A+ ideas.

I'm sure you can find other solutions that better suit your particular trading setup.

The key concept applies though, regardless of who we are and how we trade – create a physical barrier between your desire to trade and your ability to execute.

It's not a full solution. See the links posted earlier for some other key parts in managing impulsivity. But it's a simple "hack" that I've found to be exceptionally effective.

I'll be using it tonight, as I trade the first session back after a long-weekend.

I hope you find the idea effective as well.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Start Your Session With IF-THEN Scenarios

 

Last Sunday I shared one of my old articles via social media.

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Click on the image, or this link here, if you wish to read the old article.

This is such an important part of my pre-session preparation.

Why?

It simply aims to get my session off to a good start – so very important for maintaining an effective mindset throughout the trading day.

This is not prediction. This is simply forward planning… developing “IF-THEN” scenarios based upon your assessment of the likely future price action.

If your “read” of price movement proves correct, you will have trade opportunity. If it proves incorrect, you stand aside and reassess.

This will ensure your actions in the market are pre-considered and your trades only occur when the market has confirmed your expectations.

And you will be less likely to be caught in a trap through impulsive reaction to unexpected price movement.

NOTE: What I am doing here with my IF-THEN analysis is NOT the same as the Game Planning / Hypos that you see other traders doing. Typically they're looking at much higher timeframes or Market/Volume Profile tools to determine a likely hypothesis for the WHOLE DAY.

I'm looking at the trading timeframe and where the market opens with respect to key levels, and assessing likely movement for the OPENING FEW PRICE SWINGS ONLY.

There is of course nothing to stop you using both. Whole session, higher-timeframe game planning plus opening sequence trading-timeframe IF-THEN scenarios.

It's just important here for me to point out the difference.

These are not meant to define the whole session. They just aim to get you off to a good start.

And from there, the picture keeps updating bar by bar in accordance with the YTC Six Principles of Future Trend Projection.

Anyway, let's look at my opening IF-THEN scenarios for the week to date, in the emini-NASDAQ (NQ) market:

Monday – 13th February 2017

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Tuesday – 14th February 2017

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Wednesday – 15th February 2017

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Thursday – 16th February 2017

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

Start your session with IF-THEN analysis

So as we head towards the open on Friday, why not consider creating your own IF-THEN statements for the opening couple of price swings.

They won't always be right.

But when they are, it means that your actions in the market are pre-considered and your trades only occur when the market "makes sense".

And when the market offers something different, you simply stand aside and reassess.

It's all about getting your session off to the best start possible, through minimising emotional reaction to surprising and unexpected price movement.

Give it a try. You may just like the idea.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

A BOF Trade with Many YTC Concepts

 

Let's look over a trade I particularly like, from earlier this week.

It's nothing special in terms of returns. But it took an otherwise dull session from breakeven into profits.

And it displays many of the concepts that we have discussed here in the newsletter over the last few years.

So I particularly like this one. And I thought it's a good one to share to reinforce some of these key lessons.

The trade is a Breakout Failure trade following price interaction with the Prior Day's High resistance.

Breakout Failure Review 

Let's see what I liked about this trade…

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review 

Let's see the outcome…

Breakout Failure Review

Breakout Failure Review 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

 

Today I want to share with you some examples of the work done by Johnny, as he learns to read and trade the charts as taught in the YTC Price Action Trader ebook series.

Chapter 17 of Volume 5 of the ebook series provides a graduated development plan.

Before you trade live you must prove success on the sim.

And before you trade on the sim, you must ensure complete understanding of the analysis and trade concepts via historical chart study.

Johnny is working through that first stage, through detailed study of prior sessions in his chosen market (YM) and timeframe (3 minute TTF, 1 minute LTF).

His work so far is of the HIGHEST STANDARD. So much so that I absolutely had to seek permission to share it.

If you're just starting out in your journey as well, whether with my strategy or with one you developed yourself, set Johnny's work as the benchmark that you try to also achieve.

Imagine doing this for 100 prior sessions, before you even hit the sim. Yes, there are completely new challenges at the hard, right hand edge of the screen. But you'll be tackling those challenges with complete confidence in knowing what it is you're looking for. And more importantly, why!

The following charts have been compressed in size in order to fit on the webpage. If you click each image it will open a larger copy in a new browser window.

You'll note that they all examine the exact same price sequence, from a number of different perspectives – (a) Trend Assessment, (b) Clues and Observations, (c) Changes in Sentiment, (d) Changes in Structure, and (e) Setup Areas.

I hope you get great value out of this. If it inspires even just one of you to improve the quality of your own learning, this will have been a massive success. Thanks Johnny!

Enjoy…

 

TREND

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study 

CLUES AND OBSERVATIONS

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

CHANGES IN SENTIMENT

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

CHANGES IN STRUCTURE

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

SETUP AREAS

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

LOWER TIMEFRAME CHARTS  (note: there is some overlap from one chart to the next)

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

An Exceptional Example of Historical Chart Study

 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Leaning Your Entry Against Other Price Action

 

Sometimes you're just not 100% sure.

Not quite ready to pull the trigger.

At these times it's best to wait.

Remember this – "If I could only take one trade this hour, would I be happy to make it this one? If not, pass."

Clearly if you're hesitating then the trade does not meet this criteria.

Let it pass.

And maybe… just maybe… the next couple of price bars will offer up something that makes the decision easier.

Like this…

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

If I'm unsure about a trade then I'm happy to pass.

If I miss the trade, so be it. I don't have to take every trade. I plan to trade for several more decades. My career is unlikely to be defined by this one potential trade. Let it go. And prepare for the next.

But sometimes just another few candles is all it takes. If it offers some price action structure to lean against, I'll attack that opportunity. And manage whatever follows.

Consider watching for this in your charts.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

PS. The following were some earlier articles "loosely related" to this idea, although exploring the concept on the Trading Timeframe chart rather than the Lower Timeframe chart. Either way, it's all about letting the market turn first and then entering on a slight retest, with other price action at your back. Enjoy…

 


 

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