About: Lance Beggs

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Recent Posts by Lance Beggs

What’s Going On when you Hold Past the Stop

 

I'm always fascinated to hear from traders who have trouble exiting a trade at the stop loss. The ones who move the stop loss further away to avoid the exit. And then move it further. And further.

Until eventually, they can't take the pain any more, so they get out of the trade and destroy several days, weeks or even months of profits.

Personally, I don't recall ever holding past the stop, although I have found evidence of having done it once in the past while reviewing old charts.

Hopefully this was a one-off occurrence. Either way, I've clearly learnt from that at some point.

No-one likes a loss. Me included. But you need to be quite comfortable taking them.

For those of you who have yet to learn how to take a loss, let's discuss what is happening when you hold past the stop.

(Noting of course that this is not always the only issue. Maybe not even the primary issue. Everyone's situation is somewhat unique. But it is a significant factor that I see in a whole lot of cases. So if you're letting price run through you're stops, give this some consideration. It may just be the pathway you need to explore to find your way to greater success.)

This is what we're talking about…

<image: What's going on when you hold past the stop?>

<image: What's going on when you hold past the stop?>

<image: What's going on when you hold past the stop?>

<image: What's going on when you hold past the stop?>

<image: What's going on when you hold past the stop?>

<image: What's going on when you hold past the stop?>

<image: What's going on when you hold past the stop?>

In many cases the primary issue is NOT that you fear losing any money.

Often instead, the problem is that you don't want to be wrong.

YOU DON'T WANT TO BE WRONG!

You rationalise that if you just give it a little more room, and a little more time, price will turn around and prove you right.

It's all ego!

What does it mean to be wrong?

Every trade you get wrong is a dagger in the heart, reminding you of every time you've been painfully wrong in the past. Every time you've failed at something. Every time you fell short of your hopes, dreams and prayers.

Every wrong trade is one small step closer to the ultimate failure of your trading business.

And when you're no longer worthy… what will your family think of you? What will your friends say about you? What will your own mind say about you as you desperately try to fall asleep each night to forget the pain?

You don't want to be wrong!

So you move the stop to give it a little more room. But the fear only increases as price continues to move against you.

You give it more room. Again the fear increases.

And then again… you give it more room.

Until finally… acceptance… you know you're wrong.

And now it's about the money.

The loss is big, but fear of it getting even bigger lets you get out. Because you KNOW you're wrong.

Again, please note that this is not always the only issue. Maybe not always the primary issue. Everyone's situation is somewhat unique. But it is a significant factor in a whole lot of cases.

So if you're letting price run through you're stops, give this some consideration. It may just be the pathway you need to explore to find your way to greater success.

Here's the problem, as I see it.

You're playing the wrong game.

You're playing a game of individual trades.

But this business is not about individual trades.

The outcome of any one trade is irrelevant.

We profit over a series of trades.

You need to accept that this game is not one of being right. But rather one of managing a sequence of wins and losses so that over a large enough sample we can produce a profit.

Wins!

And losses!

They're just a part of the game.

What if you accepted that half your trades would win and half will lose. And you made it your aim to ensure that over any series of trades (20+) your average win was greater than your average loss?

To do this, you absolutely CANNOT let your losses run larger than they need to be.

Take your losses, quickly and decisively. Keep them small. It's only one in 20+ trades in your current series. You've got a whole lot of trades still to come. And some of them will more than compensate for the small loss.

By all means, aim for as high a win rate as you can achieve. But seriously… a 50% win rate IS enough. Just aim to ensure your average win is greater than your average loss.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

PS. If this article was useful, you might want to read this as well – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/Winning-Through-Losing-Better-1-of-2/

 


 

Simple Session Bias – 2

 

Last week I introduced two quick and simple methods for establishing the "bigger picture" bias for the trading session.

Let's look at this concept one more time, reviewing all sessions since last week's publication.

We will focus this time on the opening range method (my preferred method) and go into a little more detail.

Friday 3rd August 2018

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

Monday 6th August 2018

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

Tuesday 7th August 2018

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

Of note… this session was also the focus of a social media post. You can see it here on either twitter or facebook.

Wednesday 8th August 2018

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

Thursday 9th August 2018

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

Next Step…

Now it's time for you to take action.

If you like the idea, start applying it to your markets for a few weeks to see if it adds value to your own analysis and trade decision making.

Maintaining context is essential for effective price action trading. The "bigger picture" session bias is a key part of this context. And will hopefully have you trading (more often than not) on the right side of the market.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Simple Session Bias

 

Maintaining context is essential for effective price action trading.

And while that is true for all timeframes, it's especially so in the lower intraday timeframes where you can easily get caught up in the tick-by-tick battle between the bulls and bears.

My primary tools for context are the trend structure which I view on the trading timeframe chart and a support and resistance framework on a higher timeframe chart. All revealed here if you're interested.

But over time I've adopted a slight addition to this plan.

One additional piece of context data.

Very quick to establish. And very simple.

It essentially provides me with an immediate "bigger picture" assessment as to whether the session as a whole should be considered bullish, bearish or neutral.

I don't restrict trading to this session bias direction (although some people may choose to do so). I trade with reference to the trend and S/R structure, as discussed earlier. But the session bias helps to weight my preference slightly to this "bigger picture" direction.

When trading with the session bias I might show a little more patience in letting a trade prove itself. And a little more confidence in holding for larger targets.

Against the session bias, I might prefer to limit myself to A+ quality trades only. I might require them to prove themselves more quickly, or else I'll be scaling back the risk. And I might be satisfied with closer targets.

The method is simple – just display the opening range on a higher timeframe chart. Price holding above the opening range is bullish. Price holding below is bearish. Stuck at the opening range (or in the vicinity) is neutral.

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

VWAP works great as well. Again, price above VWAP is bullish and below is bearish. While price oscillating around the VWAP is more neutral.

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias>

<image: Simple Session Bias> 

Interestingly, you will note that both methods produce a slightly different result, at times, in particular immediately following the session open. That's completely normal. And it's fine (we're only getting a feel for a "bigger picture" bias here). Just be consistent in whichever you use.

Play with some charts and explore the use of either the opening range or VWAP. Or find your own method. There are many options.

Whatever you choose, just keep it simple.

No "analysis" required. Just an immediate visual assessment of bullish, bearish, or neutral.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Patience at the Open

 

Until you have a good read of the market, there is NO TRADE.

  • Confidence in your real-time understanding of the market structure.
  • Confidence in your real-time understanding of the nature of price movement.
  • Confidence in your real-time assessment of market bias.
  • Confidence in your projection of that market bias forward in time and price.

 

And most importantly:

  • An understanding of how future price movement should behave if your forward projection has some validity.
  • And confidence in your ability to adjust your understanding (and your trading decisions) should price movement offer something unexpected.

 

In simpler language… if you don't know what's going on… you have no business trading.

Watch and wait until some clarity appears, in terms of structure, price movement and opportunity.

The market open is one time which has great potential for confusion, doubt and uncertainty.

I remind myself before the open that there is no need to rush the first trade. If it screams out to be taken, then take it. But otherwise, be patient and allow myself time to get in sync with the flow of price.

Here are two of the market opening "warning signs" that have me keeping my trigger finger well clear of the mouse.

1. Bias Conflict

During the session I maintain a sense of the bias through the YTC Price Action Trader rules for trend projection.

At the session open though, I like to complement this with a really simple and objective method – the opening range breakout.

If they're in agreement, it's game on.

But if they conflict, it's a sign to be patient and wait till they come into alignment.

<image: Patience at the Open>

<image: Patience at the Open>

<image: Patience at the Open>

<image: Patience at the Open>

2. Seriously BAD LOOKING Price Action

Not just bad looking price action. We're talking seriously bad looking price action.

<image: Patience at the Open>

<image: Patience at the Open>

Remain Patient. Watch and Wait.

<image: Patience at the Open>

<image: Patience at the Open>

<image: Patience at the Open>

<image: Patience at the Open>

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

The Mindset of a Champion

 

This social media post from last Sunday is just SO IMPORTANT, I thought we should expand upon it and get the ideas out to the whole YTC audience.

<image: The Mindset of a Champion>

This is just a perfect example of a growth mindset, viewing losses as feedback that serve to drive further improvement and growth.

There are two things that I love about this.

1. It is SO ACTIONABLE.

Look to your own post-session procedures and ensure that you are approaching your review in the same way.

Serena Williams:

  • "I'm already deciphering what I need to improve on, what I need to do, what I did wrong, why I did it wrong, how I can do better…"

 

Let's make this relevant to our job:

  • What decisions were less than ideal? (Consider all aspects of today's trading, including your physical, mental and emotional state, your work environment, your ability to analyse the market, to get in sync with the price action, to recognise opportunity and to execute on that opportunity.)
  • Why did I make these decisions?
  • What alternate decisions would have improved my performance?
  • What can I do to ensure I make better decisions in the future?

 

2. It finishes with POSITIVE ENCOURAGEMENT.

After the review is complete and steps for improvement have been identified…

Serena Williams:

  • "OK, I do improve with losses. We'll see how it goes."

 

"I do improve with losses."

Beautiful!

Zero baggage carried forward into the next game.

Consider adding that to your own post-session procedures:

  • "I do improve with losses. Let's see how it goes tomorrow."

 

But Wait… Let's Make this Even Better…

Sunday's post also featured some great points from Nicholas…

<image: The Mindset of a Champion>

<image: The Mindset of a Champion>

If you want to be great you cannot settle for "good enough". You need to CONSTANTLY PUSH TO BE GREATER.

So let's improve the earlier post-session review items, ensuring they consider all sessions regardless of whether we outperformed or underperformed.

Step 1:

  • What decisions were less than ideal? (Consider all aspects of today's trading, including your physical, mental and emotional state, your work environment, your ability to analyse the market, to get in sync with the price action, to recognise opportunity and to execute on that opportunity.)
  • Why did I make these decisions?
  • What alternate decisions would have improved my performance?
  • What can I do to ensure I make better decisions in the future?

 

Step 2:

  • What decisions were excellent? (Consider all aspects of today's trading, including your physical, mental and emotional state, your work environment, your ability to analyse the market, to get in sync with the price action, to recognise opportunity and to execute on that opportunity.)
  • Why did I make these decisions?
  • What can I do to ensure I continue to make similar decisions in the future?

 

If you want to be great you cannot settle for "good enough". You need to CONSTANTLY PUSH TO BE GREATER.

Growth will be found at and beyond the edge of your comfort zone.

Welcome the frustration!

Welcome the pain!

Welcome the challenge!

And use it to DRIVE YOURSELF TO HIGHER LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

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