Tag Archives: Entry

Leaning Your Entry Against Other Price Action

 

Sometimes you're just not 100% sure.

Not quite ready to pull the trigger.

At these times it's best to wait.

Remember this – "If I could only take one trade this hour, would I be happy to make it this one? If not, pass."

Clearly if you're hesitating then the trade does not meet this criteria.

Let it pass.

And maybe… just maybe… the next couple of price bars will offer up something that makes the decision easier.

Like this…

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

Leaning your entry against other price action

If I'm unsure about a trade then I'm happy to pass.

If I miss the trade, so be it. I don't have to take every trade. I plan to trade for several more decades. My career is unlikely to be defined by this one potential trade. Let it go. And prepare for the next.

But sometimes just another few candles is all it takes. If it offers some price action structure to lean against, I'll attack that opportunity. And manage whatever follows.

Consider watching for this in your charts.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

PS. The following were some earlier articles "loosely related" to this idea, although exploring the concept on the Trading Timeframe chart rather than the Lower Timeframe chart. Either way, it's all about letting the market turn first and then entering on a slight retest, with other price action at your back. Enjoy…

 


 

If you find yourself out of your trade, the reality is that you won’t always find a way back in!

 

Hindsight analysis is always suspect. Our normal human biases have us believing that we would have made the optimal trade decisions. After all, they always look so simple with the benefit of hindsight.

So I'm always hesitant to provide my thoughts on someone else's trade review.

But it's the Christmas / New Year week and I'm feeling too lazy to think up a new article, so sharing some email Q&A solves that problem for me.

And it provides a good lesson – if you find yourself out of a trade, for whatever reason, the reality is that you won't always find a way back in.

If you've scratched a trade to reassess and decide that there is still potential, unless you're just willing to enter at market then and there, or place a limit order at some point closer to the stop area, you might not find a way to re-enter. Pattern triggers may not eventuate.

And that's fine. Review the decision that led to the initial scratching. And move on.

I scratch trades a lot. If I doubt a trade, I'll reduce risk through either a partial or full exit, and then reassess. If I'm happy with the premise, I'll look to get back in. But sometimes… there is no good way to get back in.

In developing as a trader and discovering whether you better fit the passive set and forget trade management style, or a more active style such as I use, this is a factor that you need to consider. If you find yourself out of your trade, the reality is that you won't always find a way back in.

Anyway, here's the Q&A from a trader who recently asked me to review one of their EUR/USD trades, in which they took profits early but then were unable to get back in.

The question was sent to me in image chart form. It's displayed here in smaller format, in order to fit. If you click on the image it will open a full-size version in your browser. All following images are already full size.

INITIAL QUESTION:

You won't always find a way back in

 

REPLY:

You won't always find a way back in

You won't always find a way back in

You won't always find a way back in

You won't always find a way back in

You won't always find a way back in

You won't always find a way back in

You won't always find a way back in

You won't always find a way back in

You won't always find a way back in

You won't always find a way back in 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

“But it’s scary!” “What if it fails?”

 

I received some interesting comments about a trade in a recent article – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly/

Here's an image from the article, showing the entry SHORT against a single wide-range bullish candle.

Single candle pullback

Review the original article if you want to see the context behind the trade.

For now though, I want to discuss some concerns that a few people expressed. Because I imagine there are a whole lot more who felt the same thing.

The feedback was quite varied in nature.

A couple of people really "got it". They understood that while the candle appears to show great bullish strength, the internal movement didn't necessarily suggest that was the case.

But many more expressed concern, either commenting on the post or via email. Some short extracts:

  • "I don't understand, how you are comfortable to take up the 2nd setup"
  • "But it's scary."
  • "What if it fails?"

 

I get it!

Here's the thing…

YES…

It is scary if all you see is the strong bullish candle.

BUT…

It's in a good contextual location. It has a good R:R. And I don't just place a limit order and let it get overrun. I'm watching and waiting to see some inability to continue further before placing the entry order.

SOME IMPORTANT POINTS:

  • These are some of the toughest trades that I do take (from a psychological perspective).
  • They're simple in concept. But they are not easy.
  • They're not for new traders.
  • If you're not comfortable with them, don't take them. Stick to the easier ones. But learn from them. Maybe take note of them when you do see them and then study them post-session. As you gain experience it might be something you one day add to your game plan.
  • Again… let me reinforce the last point. You don't have to trade these if your skill level is not ready for them. There are much easier setups available.

 

I went looking for something similar over the last fortnight, so that we could work through another example. But there hasn't really been a great example since then.

But then I thought maybe this one will help.

The context is different. But the fear is much the same.

Whenever I've posted these type of trades in the past I tend to get much the same feedback – "There is no way you can enter here!", "You're stepping in front of a freight train!", "It's too scary!", "But what if it fails?"

One other thing I like about this example is that it slows the process down, with the end of the pullback occurring over 3 candles. This might make things a little easier to see.

So anyway… here it is…

But it's scary! What if it fails?

But it's scary! What if it fails?

But it's scary! What if it fails?

But it's scary! What if it fails?

But it's scary! What if it fails?

But it's scary! What if it fails?

But it's scary! What if it fails?

As we discussed here in these articles, until I see evidence of the break lower holding these levels, I'm expecting a break like this to fail.

 

It's a simple shift in mindset that makes these traps easier to enter.

Of course, it's never completely comfortable.

The move down to the level does display some bearish strength. And as readers of my ebook series will note, I'm not a fan of fading strength.

But in the case of a break of a level like this, at the end of a long move, it's the behaviour of price AFTER THE BREAK that really matters.

Will price show continued bearish strength and drop like a ton of bricks? Or will it stall and then break back higher?

As I noted earlier, I do NOT just place a limit order in a situation such as this and hope that it all works out ok.

I watch. I wait. And if I see evidence that the selling is perhaps all done, only then will I consider entry.

Let's move forward and see what happens.

But it's scary! What if it fails?

But it's scary! What if it fails?

Here's the outcome:    (clearly underperforming when you see the TTF eventually break to new highs… but still it's a good trade!)

But it's scary! What if it fails?

I mentioned earlier…

It's in a good contextual location. It has a good R:R. And I don't just place a limit order and let it get overrun. I'm watching and waiting to see some inability to continue further before placing the entry order.

This applied with the trade two weeks ago.

And it applied with today's trade.

This is what gives me confidence to enter.

And if it fails?

So what? It's one trade.

If it loses, I'll keep the loss small.

This is not a game of certainty. The market environment is uncertain. Some trades will win. Some will lose. Work to keep the average loss smaller than the average win.

But it's scary! What if it fails?

Let's wrap up…

Yes, it's hard to enter against a break. Or against a strong single candle pullback.

If you're not comfortable with this, stand aside and wait for something easier. But observe them. Make decisions as you watch them live. And take notes. Study them post-session. As you gain confidence, you might want to consider sim trading a few. And eventually trying them live (small size).

But if it's in a good contextual location. And if the R:R is acceptable. Then watch. And wait. And if price shows that it's given all it's got, and appears unable to move any further in the pullback direction, then take the trade.

Manage it.

Keep the losses tight. And if it wins, then squeeze it for all the profits you can get.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

The Other Trader (4)

 

Let's continue with the metagame concepts discussed in recent months.

Here – The Other Trader
Here – The Other Trader (2)
Here – The Other Trader (3)
Here – Metagame Trading

And of course based upon concepts from here: YTC Price Action Trader

Here is the basic idea…

If I can't feel someone on the other side of the market getting it really wrong, there is no trade.

Here's how we do it.

 

1

Identify a potential trap

 

Identify a potential trap

Identify a potential trap

Identify a potential trap

Identify a potential trap

Identify a potential trap

 

1

Feel the pain

 

Feel the pain

Feel the pain

Feel the pain

 

1

Spring the trap

 

Spring the trap

For those with the YTC Price Action Trader:

  • Setup – See Volume 3, Chapter 4, Pages 28 to 31
  • Entry trigger – See Volume 3, Chapter 4, Page 87, Figure 4.63 (third entry in the table)

 

If you're not achieving the results you wish to achieve, consider placing more thought towards who is on the other side of your trade.

It may be the paradigm shift you're seeking to take your trading to new levels.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Wait till the Reversal Trader is Trapped

 

I am quite a fan of Al Brooks' first book, "Reading Price Charts Bar by Bar", despite the fact that we trade very differently.

Out of close to 400 pages, there is the one idea which has stuck with me more than any other. From page 384:

"Countertrend setups in strong trends almost always fail and become great With Trend setups…"

The idea is simple.

In a strong trend you will find all manner of reasons to suspect that the trend is ready for reversal. And you'll find yourself easily tempted to enter counter-trend.

But more often than not, it's a trap.

When you feel this strong desire to trade counter-trend, do NOT trade. Be comforted by the fact that others will notice it as well. And that they'll enter.

Then watch their position, waiting patiently until they're trapped.

The failure of their counter-trend position will often provide a great entry for you, back in the with-trend direction.

Those who trade the YTC Price Action Trader methodology will be very familiar with this concept – timing our entry off the failure of "the other trader".

This concept came to mind on Tuesday, as I felt a strong desire to enter counter-trend against a strong bearish trend in NQ.

Let's look at the charts.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Don't fade a strong trend... wait for the trap and enter with-trend.

Actually, I'm not happy with the exit decisions. But that's something for me to explore in my trade review process.

In terms of setup and entry… I love this one.

"Countertrend setups in strong trends almost always fail and become great With Trend setups…"

Keep this in mind next time the price bars scream out for you to fade a strong trend.

Is it actually a trap?

And is better opportunity perhaps available if you stand aside and wait for the "other traders" to be caught?

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Open Drive – First Pullback

 

When the market drives in one direction straight from the open, I’m ALWAYS watching the first pullback for trade opportunity.

Open drive - first pullback

Open drive - first pullback

Open drive - first pullback

Open drive - first pullback

Open drive - first pullback

Open drive - first pullback

Open drive - first pullback

Open drive - first pullback

Open drive - first pullback

Open drive - first pullback

A strong open drive might only happen a couple of times a month.

But when it happens, I'm ALWAYS watching the first pullback for trade opportunity.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Trading the Retest of a Point of Structural Change

 

One of our aims in trading the financial markets is to make sure that we're trading in the right places on the price chart.

Places which make sense when viewed from the perspective of the psychology of the market participants.

Places which make sense when viewed from the perspective of the structure of the market.

Today we look at one of these places – the retest of a point of structural change.

We've addressed this concept briefly in the past. If you haven't seen this prior article you may wish to review it first.

http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/retesting-the-point-of-structural-change/

The prior article summarised the concept as follows: 

Retesting the point of structural change

All examples in that article dealt with structural patterns on the trading timeframe.

But the same concept can be applied across a much larger time scale, with trade opportunity found as markets retest a point of higher timeframe structural change.

That was the idea behind the following trade.

We'll start by examining a much higher timeframe in order to see the structure develop over the prior four days.

Retesting the point of structural change

Volatility contraction is never fun to trade. Monday was slow and boring. Tuesday was worse.

But in the back of my mind at these times is an expectation that this volatility contraction must end at some stage.

And the expansion of volatility on a break from these patterns can provide great
trading conditions.

So let's move forward to Wednesday to see how the breakout eventually occurs. And to see whether or not it then offers us a nice BPB setup entry long.

Retesting the point of structural change

Damn! We missed it.

Or maybe not?

Let's move ahead 30 minutes into Wednesday's session.

Retesting the point of structural change

From a structural perspective, this is a beautiful place to be seeking opportunity long. Previous resistance often provides support once broken and retested.

From the metagame perspective, it's also a beautiful place to be seeking opportunity long.

Anyone with a bullish bias who missed the overnight breakout has now been gifted an ideal "second chance" entry opportunity.

Those already holding a long position have been provided an ideal scenario to add to their position.

And for those who managed to get short from the open on Wednesday, the market is at the ideal area for profit taking (ie. buy orders).

There is good reason to be buying here.

Let's look to the trading timeframe to see how it played out.

(more…)

The Other Trader (3)

 

In recent months we looked at a number of metagame examples – trading at places where the "the other trader" feels extreme stress or fear.

You'll find some of these articles, if you missed them, here, here and here.

Today, I thought we could look at another one. Because I just LOVE these setups.

You might recall this general concept from prior articles:

Trading based upon feeling the stress and fear of "the other trader"

Things don't always go according to plan though.

Trading based upon feeling the stress and fear of "the other trader"

If you missed the entry… no problems.

Let it go. It wasn't yours to catch.

There will be MANY other trade opportunities. Stay focused.

In fact… sometimes that next opportunity comes along VERY quickly.

Trading based upon feeling the stress and fear of "the other trader"

Trading based upon feeling the stress and fear of "the other trader"

Let's look at an example, a BOF setup on break of the high of day.

We'll start with the higher timeframe chart to get some context. And then move on to the trading timeframe and lower timeframe charts to discuss the trade opportunity.

Trading based upon feeling the stress and fear of "the other trader"

Trading based upon feeling the stress and fear of "the other trader"

(more…)

The Other Trader (2)

 

As price moves into my setup areas, "the other trader" is always at the forefront of my mind.

Who created this recent move against market bias? Are they trapped? Are they feeling stress? Where is the point of extreme stress at which they'll bail out of their position?

If I can't feel someone on the other side of the market getting it really wrong, there is no trade.

In recent weeks we've looked at some examples which include a break of a key level, which then stalls and fails.

The other trader - trapped on a break of a level

You can see these recent articles here:

http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/the-other-trader/

http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/metagame-trading/

These type of trap scenarios provide some of my favourite trade entries.

The other trader - trapped on a break of a level

But we don't always need a break of a level in order to find trade opportunity.

What we're looking for is a move, against market bias, into a REALLY LOW PROBABILITY place to trade.

Like this, for example:

The other trader - trapped on a move into an area of prior congestion

Reality is never as nice as these "text book" line diagrams though.

So let's look at a real-world example.

(more…)