Tag Archives: Market Structure

Overnight Range Double Break

 

There were three NQ sessions in the last two weeks which broke both sides of the overnight range. Let's check them out.

The following are all Higher Timeframe 15 minute charts. I chose this timeframe simply because it fits on the image quite nicely. Whatever higher timeframe you use, is fine. The concept here is the same.

<image: Overnight Range Double Break>

<image: Overnight Range Double Break>

<image: Overnight Range Double Break>

<image: Overnight Range Double Break>

<image: Overnight Range Double Break>

<image: Overnight Range Double Break>

<image: Overnight Range Double Break>

<image: Overnight Range Double Break>

<image: Overnight Range Double Break>

Does this always happen?

No.

Does this mean that when it does happen that the trend always will be smooth and easy to trade?

No.

But you can bet your whole account on the fact that when it does happen, I'll be prepared, focused and ready to exploit any trend that does develop.

YTC Price Action Trader with-trend setups ONLY.

Until the market proves otherwise.

Have a look through some of the charts in your own markets and see if you can identify a similar feature. Forex traders will want to use a break of both sides of a narrow range Asian session.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Daily Market Structure & Price Action Study – 8

 

See here if you missed the earlier articles – No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, No. 7

The concept:

I've been writing online for over a decade now. And for that whole time I've been promoting the idea of daily study in both Market Structure and Price Action.

It's a simple task that takes no more than five minutes, but which offers incredible value to your own learning and development.

Sometimes this study fits within certain themes, if there is a particular feature of market structure which I want to focus on for a period of time.

Often though, it's completely unstructured. Simply searching for whatever captures my attention.

Either way, every trading day after the session is over, I look to the charts to find something interesting. Having done this for so long the findings are usually just reinforcing prior lessons. But occasionally, they'll uncover something new which can lead to further exploration, further learning and further growth and development.

The following are examples of entries in my Market Structure & Price Action Journal; although tidied up and expanded upon slightly to work in newsletter article & blog format. (The real journal rarely needs more than one image and a small handful of notes.)

I hope you find it useful. If you do, consider starting your own Market Structure & Price Action Journal.

 

Wednesday, 14th August 2019

We had a day today which trended lower throughout, although never with any great bearish strength. One which just grinded it's way lower. And one which at times "tempted" entry LONG to catch the reversal.

So I thought I should use my MSPA study to find a few "bigger picture" structural signs which should have had me positioned with bearish sentiment throughout the day.

Let's begin with the prior day, Tuesday 13th August 2019.

<image: Daily Market Structure and Price Action Study>

FTC Reference – YTC Price Action Trader Vol 2, Ch 3, P 143

<image: Daily Market Structure and Price Action Study>

<image: Daily Market Structure and Price Action Study>

<image: Daily Market Structure and Price Action Study>

<image: Daily Market Structure and Price Action Study>

Lessons:

  • When the market provides multiple reasons to favour one direction over another, prior to and leading into the session open, the Opening Range can act as a nice "line in the sand" to give you confidence in holding a bias in that direction.

 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Daily Market Structure & Price Action Study – 7

 

See here if you missed the earlier articles – No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, No. 5, No. 6

The concept:

I've been writing online for over a decade now. And for that whole time I've been promoting the idea of daily study in both Market Structure and Price Action.

It's a simple task that takes no more than five minutes, but which offers incredible value to your own learning and development.

Sometimes this study fits within certain themes, if there is a particular feature of market structure which I want to focus on for a period of time.

Often though, it's completely unstructured. Simply searching for whatever captures my attention.

Either way, every trading day after the session is over, I look to the charts to find something interesting. Having done this for so long the findings are usually just reinforcing prior lessons. But occasionally, they'll uncover something new which can lead to further exploration, further learning and further growth and development.

The following are examples of entries in my Market Structure & Price Action Journal; although tidied up and expanded upon slightly to work in newsletter article & blog format. (The real journal rarely needs more than one image and a small handful of notes.)

I hope you find it useful. If you do, consider starting your own Market Structure & Price Action Journal.

 

Tuesday, 13th August 2019:

What a day this was. Or at least, what a day it started out as!

The opening drive was the feature of two social media posts. I'll copy them here if you missed them.

Post one:

<image: Opening drive post one>

And post two:

<image: Opening drive post one> 

I'm off track though. The opening drive was NOT the focus of my Market Structure & Price Action (MSPA) Journal.

Trades journal – yes.

Post session review – yes.

Because I underperformed.

But for the MSPA study, I found this interesting…

<image: Daily Market Structure and Price Action Study> 

A break of the initial balance area (opening hour) is a high probability occurrence. But despite all of that initial momentum, price could not continue.

Not even just up to retest the initial balance high. 

I was reminded of a previous MSPA entry from 30th of July, which was also shared via social media.

<image: Strong Opening Drives do not always continue> 

So the lesson today was simply a reminder of a pre-existing one. The fact that no matter how strong we see the market moving at the open, this is no guarantee of a trend day.

Sure, it might be. And we act as if it will be until proven otherwise.

But like all market analysis, we need to recognise that at best we're dealing with probabilities.

There is great danger in holding onto a belief in the state of the market, as if it's a certain thing.

Assess the state of the market. Act in accordance with that view. But don't trust it to hold forever.

Lessons:

  • Remain flexible in mindset at all times. There is no certainty. Nothing lasts forever in the markets. And when it changes, it can happen rapidly.
  • A strong opening drive is not always guaranteed to lead to a trend day.

 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Daily Market Structure & Price Action Study – 6

 

See here if you missed the earlier articles – No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4, No. 5

The concept:

I've been writing online for over a decade now. And for that whole time I've been promoting the idea of daily study in both Market Structure and Price Action.

It's a simple task that takes no more than five minutes, but which offers incredible value to your own learning and development.

Sometimes this study fits within certain themes, if there is a particular feature of market structure which I want to focus on for a period of time.

Often though, it's completely unstructured. Simply searching for whatever captures my attention.

Either way, every trading day after the session is over, I look to the charts to find something interesting. Having done this for so long the findings are usually just reinforcing prior lessons. But occasionally, they'll uncover something new which can lead to further exploration, further learning and further growth and development.

The following are examples of entries in my Market Structure & Price Action Journal; although tidied up and expanded upon slightly to work in newsletter article & blog format. (The real journal rarely needs more than one image and a small handful of notes.)

I hope you find it useful. If you do, consider starting your own Market Structure & Price Action Journal.

 

Monday, 12th August 2019:

This was a difficult session. Choppy action. Narrow range (compared to recent sessions).

Definitely a session where you wish you just took a day off.

Of course, there's no way to know that till after the fact.

What is important though is accepting that such days are a normal part of the game. And in quickly recognising any potential for unfavourable conditions.

The sooner you can recognise potential danger, the sooner you can respond and adapt.

This doesn't always mean shutting down for the day. It may well be an option. But more often than not, it's just a warning to slow down a little. Step back and be patient. Wait for the easier opportunity perhaps at the edges of the structure. Don't jump into marginal opportunity just because you "want to" trade.

So that was the focus of today's entry into my Market Structure & Price Action (MSPA) Journal – What signs were present early in the session, which identified potentially unfavourable conditions?

<image: Daily Market Structure and Price Action Study>

This is one of my go-to, most reliable, signals for potentially dangerous conditions.

If the market sentiment was bullish or bearish then price would expand from the opening region. The fact that it can't, indicates either a lack of interest from both sides of the market, or at least roughly balanced commitment from both bulls and bears. Either way, a sign of potential chop ahead.

This is NOT a signal for no trading. But rather one of caution.

Take it slow. You don't have to trade every move. Wait for something that is screaming out to be traded.

<image: Daily Market Structure and Price Action Study>

One structural feature I hate is the presence of two "levels" within close proximity. Sometimes price gets stuck between the two leading to nothing good, unless you like getting caught in a real chop-fest.

And that's where we found ourselves today.

Opening range at the top. And the overnight low at the bottom.

If market sentiment were indeed bearish then this break should have held. It didn't.

Caution is required.

Again, this is not a "no-trade" signal. Just a warning that we're not likely to have an easy trending environment. Be patient and wait for the right opportunity. Maybe something like getting LONG on the retest of the overnight low!

<image: Daily Market Structure and Price Action Study>

Volatility contraction leads to volatility expansion.

Ok, not always.

But it's a good "rule of thumb" expectation.

So when we find ourselves stuck between the opening range and the overnight low, I was very interested to see the outcome of the break from this area of compression. If that could break the high of day, and hold the break, I'd be much more comfortable.

But no, it's not to be.

Immediate failure. And straight back into the chop zone.

This is a day for extreme caution. 

Lessons:

  • Price stuck at or within the opening range = CAUTION REQUIRED.
  • Price stuck between two levels in close proximity = CAUTION REQUIRED.
  • An inability for a break from volatility contraction to provide any meaningful expansion = CAUTION REQUIRED.

 

Simple!

As mentioned earlier, this daily activity rarely takes more than about 5 minutes. But I feel that it's been an incredibly important part of my own learning and development.

Often there is nothing earth-shattering, although it can happen. Usually after having done this for so long I find it's just reinforcing prior observations and seeing new instances of prior patterns.

All acting to build upon the mental models which I will use in the future to navigate the unfolding landscape.

If you haven't done so already, consider adopting the same habit. Every day – find something interesting in the markets to add to your Market Structure & Price Action (MSPA) Journal.

And as a side-note… consider doing the same with trades as well. Every day – find one A+ trade opportunity, whether you took it or not. Study it. And add charts and notes to your Trades Journal.

Short-term minimal effort. Long-term massive gain!

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Traps Just Before RTH Open – 2

 

A few months ago we examined the concept of traps occurring in the price action just before, or immediately after, the RTH Open (RTH = Regular Trading Hours).

I'll place links to the prior articles at the bottom of this one, if you want to review them.

Today, let's look at another example of a breakout very late in the pre-session market, just before the RTH Open.

This is something which I absolutely LOVE to see. Because if that breakout fails, then it often sets up quite favourable conditions from the open. And so I'm keen to get a trade on as soon as I can.

No patience. No delays. It's game on!

Here's the general concept:

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

This concept can be applied in any market which offers pre-session trading leading into a clearly defined "regular" day session. Spot forex traders might apply it at the UK open, or the US open.

Today's example set up a break of the overnight high. That is, the same concept as the second image above.

Let's start by looking at a higher timeframe chart, to get some wider context.

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

And the breakout on the Trading Timeframe chart:

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open> 

I've written a lot about displaying patience at the open. About waiting till the bias is clear and trading conditions are favourable.

But there are some situations where I don't display patience.

Where I'm keen to get a trade on as soon as I can.

No patience. No delays. It's game on!

One of these situations is when the market sets up a trap just before or just after the RTH Open.

Keep an eye out for similar opportunity in your own trading.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 

Prior Articles:

Traps Just Before RTH Open – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/traps-just-before-rth-open/

Traps At The Open – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/traps-at-the-open/

Traps At The Open 2 – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/traps-at-the-open-2/

 


 

Targeting the Overnight High or Low – 2

 

Last week we discussed one of my current favourite plays for the first 30-60 minutes of the session – targeting the overnight high (ONH) or overnight low (ONL).

You can review last week's discussion here.

Just a few hours after sending out that email the market opened again. And the same concept played out once more. Let's check it out.

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

You don't have to manage your trades like this. It's just the way that makes most sense to me. If there is any threat of a trade moving into negative territory, I prefer to scratch it and reassess, rather than holding and hoping for it to recover.

Sometimes that works to my advantage. Other times it doesn't.

This method of trade management does require you to be completely comfortable with re-entering.

If you're not able to easily re-enter, you'll be better operating with a wider stop and a more passive set & forget style. On this particular day, your trade would have worked out fine.

Back to the trade…

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

As mentioned in the prior article, there is a very high probability that the overnight high or overnight low will be hit at some point during the session.

And a good probability that it will occur within the opening hour of the session.

I could give you stats for the last few months. But I'd rather you find them yourself. You'll learn more this way.

If it interests you, spend some time over the weekend to review the prior two to three months to get an idea of just how high these probabilities are.

And then monitor the concept in coming weeks in your own markets. Perhaps you'll also find the overnight high or overnight low provide nice targets for early trade opportunity.

Please realise though – this is NOT the setup. The concept we're discussing here is simply selection of a high probability target. Take whatever setups you normally take from the open. Manage risk as you normally would, because they won't all work. But when they do work, the fact that the target is backed by some really high probability stats, can make it quite easy to hold.

Sometimes they work really well:

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

But occasionally, not so well.

The very next day fails to reach both the ONH and ONL. If you held a trade for either of these targets, it would have fallen well short.

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

There are NEVER certainties. No matter how high the probability, some targets will fall on the losing side of the stats. So manage risk, as per normal. And expect a challenge. If it hits the target quickly, as it sometimes will, consider it a bonus.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Targeting the Overnight High or Low

 

I've become rather fond of targeting either the overnight high (ONH) or overnight low (ONL) during early session trading.

If you're new to this idea, schedule some time to look back at the last few weeks of charts and take note of how many times they hit. For the ten sessions leading up to today's trading, nine sessions have hit either the ONH or ONL. Six of these occurring in the opening 30 minutes of the trading session. Seven within the opening hour.

So not only can we use the ONH/ONL as levels to trade off. But they also offer a price target for PB/CPB trade opportunity early in the session.

Of course, some happen too quickly to offer any opportunity. But otherwise, if the bias is clear and a valid setup is in place with sufficient room to the level, take the trade.

Let's start with a 30 minute chart to get some "bigger picture" context.

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

Dropping to the 1 minute trading timeframe:

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

Before you even consider looking for a trade entry, you need a target. You should have some sense of WHERE the market is going.

The ONH and ONL are two levels which I like to use as a price target in the opening 30-60 minutes of a session.

Have a look at recent sessions in your preferred markets. How many times has the market hit the ONH or ONL? How soon within the session?

Perhaps you'll also find they act as good initial price targets for early session trades.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Choose YOUR Playing Field

 

One of the most obvious changes in my own trading over the last decade is a willingness to take fewer trades.

It used to be that if there was a price swing… I wanted to trade it.

On the plus side this meant that I was there for everything that did move to good profits. But it also meant that I had to suffer through many sequences where the market went nowhere and the best I could hope for was to grind out a breakeven result.

Now, I'm quite content to let the market play without me. If I miss opportunity, so be it.

I don't need to trade everything that moves.

Instead, I aim to stick to the easier sequences. The times in the market that typically have greater range. And the places within the structure that are more likely to offer favourable conditions.

I choose MY playing field. And I play MY game. What the market does outside of this game, is of no concern at all.

Let's start by looking at a Higher Timeframe chart to get some context:

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

You don't have to trade every price sequence.

Choose YOUR playing field.

And make sure you're playing YOUR game, not the markets.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Traps at the Open – 2

 

I had no plans to continue the recent article series but the market had different ideas, so here we are!

First, if you missed the prior articles then see here – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/traps-just-before-rth-open/

And here – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/traps-at-the-open/

And that brings us to today's sequence…

We'll start with a quick look at the prior day and overnight session, for a bit of "bigger picture" context.

<image: Traps at the Open>

<image: Traps at the Open>

<image: Traps at the Open>

<image: Traps at the Open>

<image: Traps at the Open>

<image: Traps at the Open>

<image: Traps at the Open>

<image: Traps at the Open>

<image: Traps at the Open>

<image: Traps at the Open>

I hesitated to show this example, as it's really a very quick and small trap. And a difficult entry based on a very minor lower-timeframe stall.

But sometimes that is all the market offers. And given the potential for a trap at the open to provide a nice momentum drive, it's one that I had to take.

Part of me wonders whether I'd take this entry anyway even if there had not been a trap. I had a bullish bias due to the pre-session action holding above the prior day's range. Plus the fact that I expected some range expansion on the open following a narrow range holiday session.

We'll never know for sure. Perhaps I would have taken it. I suspect not though. The lower timeframe trigger pattern was a little "smaller" and less defined than I would perhaps have liked. It really was the presence of the trap, albeit small, that provided the confidence to go for it.

For me… a trap entry prior to or right on the open is something that will often have me taking the quick early trade. Without that, I prefer to sit and wait. Let any opening congestion clear itself. Let the structure develop. And then trade once I have some clarity regarding the bias and market conditions.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Traps at the Open

 

Our last article discussed one of the times when I show no patience at the open. One of the times when I'm keen to get a trade on as soon as I can.

No patience. No delays. It's game on!

You can see it here if you missed it – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/traps-just-before-rth-open/

That article dealt with a trap in the market structure JUST BEFORE the RTH open. (RTH = Regular Trading Hours)

Today let's look at a situation very closely related to that. It's a trap IMMEDIATELY AFTER the RTH open. It's another situation in which I don't wait for the market to establish a clear trend structure.

Here was the concept from last week:

<image: Traps JUST BEFORE the Open>

But what if the open comes… and the market hasn't provided that trap?

<image: Traps JUST AFTER the Open>

That's fine.

If it's a good level, I prepare myself for for a trap anyway in the opening few price bars. If the market is nice enough to offer that, I'll be ready to get in on the first available opportunity.

<image: Traps JUST AFTER the Open>

Let's look at an example…

<image: Traps JUST AFTER the Open>

<image: Traps JUST AFTER the Open>

<image: Traps JUST AFTER the Open>

<image: Traps JUST AFTER the Open>

<image: Traps JUST AFTER the Open>

Personal preference – I don't just hit BUY MARKET. I prefer to find a way to better control risk through certain TTF/LTF patterns, as outlined in the YTC Price Action Trader.

If I miss the move, so be it. Let it go. It wasn't mine to catch.

But otherwise, remain patient and watch for a retest of the range highs.

<image: Traps JUST AFTER the Open>

If ever in doubt about the structure of the market, don't rush to trade. There is no hurry. Let the market open and complete the first swing or two. Let the structure develop and then trade once you have some clarity.

But sometimes, when the pre-market sets up just right, there will be opportunity available within that opening sequence.

One of my favourites is a trap in the market structure, setting up just before, or just after the market open.

Keep an eye out for this concept, in your market and your timeframes.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs