Tag Archives: Post-Session Procedure

If you are not growing as a trader, then this is the problem…

 

I received the following message via social media late last year.

  • I am frustrated. Despite all knowledge on stock analysis, momentum indicators, writing journal I make losses. Whereas I know person with nothing of these making huge profits everyday. She goes and buy stock and it would fly higher. When she sells stock would go down. I am beginning to believe in luck.

 

This was my immediate reply:

 

We've covered this topic several times over the last couple of years but I continue to see evidence that more work is required.

Let's examine my response in a little more detail.

First, my writing was "lazy" in suggesting that success is not a result of knowledge. Nor of simply working hard.

Of course, there is some level of knowledge required. And of effort.

I simply made an assumption that the trader had reached adequate levels of both knowledge and effort. Perhaps this is wrong. I have no idea. They mentioned the stock market, but I have no insight into their strategy, their level knowledge, nor their levels of skill.

However, regardless of this deficiency in my reply, the last part is the key.

  • If you're not growing as a trader, then the problem is that your review processes are not driving any growth. Fix your review processes.

 

Frustration for someone already possessing the necessary knowledge and effort, will typically be a result of deficiency in strategy, processes or skill.

Regardless of the cause, an effective review process will make this clear.

Ensure your trading process captures sufficient data to provide meaningful feedback.

Ensure your review processes adequately assess this feedback in order to understand the cause of the current results and identify potential areas for growth.

Growth requires an effective feedback loop.

<image: If you are not growing as a trader, this is the problem...>

<image: If you are not growing as a trader, this is the problem...>

If you're not growing as a trader, then the problem is that your review processes are not driving any growth.

Fix your review processes.

Ensure your trading process captures sufficient data to provide meaningful feedback.

Ensure your review processes adequately assess this feedback in order to understand the cause of the current results and identify potential areas for growth.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Why You SHOULDN’T Get Anyone to Review Your Trade

 

I receive a LOT of requests to review people's trades. Rarely winning trades. Almost always a trade which either lost or was scratched at or near breakeven.

  • "Was this a good trade?"
  • "Was I right to take this trade?"
  • "Should I have (entered earlier / entered later)?"
  • Or any other variation of these type of questions.

 

I get why. We're all trying to improve and so it makes sense to seek guidance from another trader.

And I don't mind people sending them.It's really cool. I like looking over them.

But I'm very hesitant to offer any real guidance, unless I can see something that is either ridiculously lacking in edge or completely reckless and irresponsible from a money management perspective.

Why?

Not because I don't want to help.

But because I recognise the danger of focusing on one individual trade – the fact that any advice I offer has just as much potential to damage their edge as it does to improve it.

The thing is, I am COMPLETELY LACKING in some very important information.

As discretionary traders, we are ALL unique in so many ways.

Even those who trade based upon my approach and the ideas I share through my site. No-one can become a perfect clone of me. And no-one should expect to. Those who I've seen have the most success are those who intentionally aim to blend some of my ideas and methods with their own. But even those who try to trade "exactly" like I do, I'm always blown away by the variation in how we read the markets and how we exploit edge within that "read".

Everyone is unique.

We all have our own preference for different types of trades. And different environments. The conditions that I find most favourable, might be the conditions in which you struggle the most. The conditions in which I underperform, and which I seek to avoid at all cost, might be the exact conditions that you excel in.

If I try to force you into my view of the markets, based upon review of only ONE SINGLE TRADE, I might completely mess up your trading.

Let's try a really simple example, so that this will hopefully make sense to you.

Let's say for example that I excel in with-trend setups. I feel the price flow really well. I'm in sync with the market. It feels fun. And kind of easy. But at the same time, I tend to grossly underperform whenever I find myself trying to enter counter-trend. I don't read them well. I'm rarely in sync with price movement. It's not fun. And results show it's never easy.

And then let's say you send through a trade. You guessed it – counter-trend. And of course, it lost. And you asked, "Lance, can you share your thoughts on this trade? Can you see where it went wrong and what I should do to improve?"

Have a guess what my immediate thoughts will be.

"Well there's the obvious problem. You're fading the trend. Hey, don't feel bad. Everyone seems to want to fade the market. But the odds are always better in the with-trend direction. Why don't you try to restrict yourself to the with-trend direction instead."

Ok, maybe this would help them. But maybe not.

I don't know this person. I have no insight into their unique blend of knowledge, skill and attitude. I have no insight into their preferred style of trading. Or which market environment or conditions best suit them and their style of trading.

It might be that this trader naturally struggles to trade with-trend. But they have some exceptional and natural skill at recognising exhaustion at the end of a price swing and timing a counter-trend entry for a fade back to the mean (and sometimes a complete reversal).

Yes, this one trade lost. But what if any sample of 20 counter-trend trades from this trader's journal includes not only a number of losses just like this one, but also sufficient winners to not only cover the losses but also provide a nice positive expectancy outcome.

Or (far more likely) if they're still developing and not quite profitable yet, sufficient potential to achieve those winners with only a small amount of further growth and development.

If I convince this trader to abandon their approach, or in fact vary it in any way that seems "obvious" to me from one single trade example, I could be setting them back months as I lead them blindly in the wrong direction.

It doesn't matter if it's me you're asking for the review. Or any other trader.

ONE TRADE is insufficient information for me, or any other trader, to provide you with any real value.

I'm sure this opinion is unpopular. Clearly I expect many will disagree with me.

But that's fine.

Because you shouldn't need to send any single trades through to me. Or to any other educator or trading mentor.

Let me share with you a better plan.

Let me share the response I sent out to a trader this week, who sent me a trade with a few questions about (a) the quality of the trade idea and (b) whether or not he'd be better skipping first entries and waiting instead for second-chance entries.

I'm not picking on this guy. I actually quite like his trade. The entry at least. It didn't reach the target but his timing was good enough that the market offered enough movement and time to scratch the trade or take small profits. (He got out at breakeven so no harm done).

I share this (with his permission) simply because I thought my response was important. I wanted to share it with all of you.

This trader says he's coming along quite well. In his words, he's "finally starting to see how this might work". He's found a method that seems to fit his personality, but is still requiring improvement in some areas.

The following chart shows the trade sometime well after the entry. It was eventually scratched for breakeven. The notes have been added by me.

It's not actually important you see his trade. It's my response that's important. But hey… no-one likes trading articles that don't have a chart in them. So here it is:

<image: Breakout Failure Entry>

Here's an excerpt from my email response (with a little editing to improve it):

– – –

These are difficult questions to answer. Let me explain why.

What if I tell you not to take these trades because I don't like factors a, b & c. But what if also I don't see factors x, y & z, that you do see. It might be that you're good at picking these trades in which 6 out of 10 may fail, but 4 out of 10 may go on to give 5R winners. If I tell you not to take them, I could be destroying an edge that you have but which I just cannot see.

(An example here would be… what if I told you not to take counter-trend trades because they're far more difficult… stick to with-trend trades. But I'm basing this off one single trade example. Where it could be the fact that you're quite skilled in picking the turn points and do have an edge over a longer series of trades. If I tell you not to take them, I could be destroying an edge that you have but which I just cannot see from one single trade example.)

Analysis of one trade is largely irrelevant. Look to stats for groups of trades.

When you have group stats then you can look for what is working and what needs to be changed. Without that foundation I'm just poking around in the dark. I'm lacking context with regards to the desired outcome.

So, my question to you is, based upon your 20 trade stats analysis, what part of your trading are you trying to improve? And why? Only then will analysis of this one trade make any sense.

I'm not blowing off your question. You're seeking answers in the wrong place. (I really need to do further training on how to grow and develop. Almost everyone gets this wrong.)

For a good starting point, until I get time to prepare this training, see these articles for a simple example of how to guide your growth and development:

http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/its-time-to-fight-to-get-to-the-next-level/

http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/its-time-to-fight-to-get-to-the-next-level-examples/

Perhaps here as well:

http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/consistency-its-a-necessary-part-of-the-process/

So here's a better plan:

  • Get absolutely clear with how you want to trade the next group of trades. 20 minimum, but feel free to adjust that number higher if you prefer. I'll use 20 in the example. As much detail as you can – what type of trades are you taking? What are you trying to achieve in taking these trades?
  • Now take 20 trades. Your individual post-trade review is not important, beyond just confirming CONSISTENCY in sticking to your plan. By all means look deeper into each trade if you wish, but the priority is just to ensure that you're achieving some degree of consistency in your trade sample.
  • Don't concern yourself with profit or loss (providing of course you're not breaking any risk or money management drawdown limits).
  • On completing the full sample, analyse the statistics related to the full group of 20. There are no shortage of stats, but the absolute minimum should be the Win% and the Win/Loss Size Ratio (WLSR) (or it's component parts being the Average Win and Average Loss).
  • Find where you are underperforming. Which statistic is most in need of improvement. If you're underperforming in multiple areas, pick one for now.
  • Dig into the individual trades and charts comprising your 20 trade sample to understand WHY they gave that statistical outcome. And WHAT you can do to improve that outcome in the next 20 trade sample.
  • If you wish (and I highly recommend this) the same can be done for any area which really outperformed this time. Find out why and see if there is anything you can do which increases the likelihood of similar outperformance in future.
  • Now repeat.

 

This is the path.

Most people just trade, review that trade, and then move on to the next trade and repeat the process. Progress is very difficult this way, as you get bogged down in individual trade problems, when they might not be an issue that impacts edge at all when considering a larger sample.

Trade larger samples. Look to the stats. And use them to drive your trade review process and define the path forward.

You don't need to ask my opinion. Anything I offer. based upon one single trade, risks being irrelevant or wrong when considering a larger sample of trades.

Plus, you have all the necessary information. The group stats will identify the area that needs examining. And the charts and journal data will provide the information necessary to understand what happened, why and what needs to be done to improve.

If stuck… sure… seek advice. But it's got to be based upon larger group stats analysis and not just ONE SINGLE individual trade.

So take 20 trades and examine the stats.

Find the underperforming statistic (Win%, Average Win or Average Loss). Look to the trade data to find out why it produced this outcome. And what can be done to improve.

Trade larger samples. Look to the stats. And use them to drive your trade review process and define the path forward.

I hope that helps.

Now, having said this, let me just finish up with a few thoughts that do somewhat answer your questions.

I do actually quite like your trade location and entry. I'd like to think I might have taken an entry there as well.

And yes, second chance entries are often a much better trade. The problem with waiting for a second chance entry is that you miss a lot of good trades though, when the first entry might have worked. Hence my preference for scratching a first trade when I suspect it's not working, but watching closely for re-entry opportunity if there is another one set up. Maybe you could consider something similar. This does has it's own downside, in that sometimes I scratch and can't get back in. Ha ha. Nothing's ever easy in this game.

Summary: Again, I actually do quite like the trade idea and entry (original and second chance). But this is all irrelevant. Take 20 or more of these trades and look at the stats. Does it provide edge? If not, where do the stats suggest underperformance? Why? And then what can you do to improve the performance over the next 20 trades.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

You Can’t Catch Them All

 

Never judge a missed trade by how it looks AFTER THE SESSION.

Always judge a missed trade by how it looked AT THE RIGHT-HAND SIDE OF THE SCREEN AT THE TIME OF ENTRY.

This article is in response to a question I received based upon the following image, from this prior article – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/how-do-you-find-time-to-plan-a-trade-on-a-1-minute-timeframe/

I didn't get an entry SHORT here... 

Here is the question I received:

  • Thank you Lance, again, for your recent article. One question that has stuck in my mind comes from the second image where you talk about the earlier missed entry. You said you can see it's an obvious trap entry point. But you weren't looking for that. Why not? Why did you miss the trade? Because, I agree with what you said. It looks obvious.

 

Check the prior article if you missed it – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/how-do-you-find-time-to-plan-a-trade-on-a-1-minute-timeframe/.

Ok, this is a common error.

It's so easy to look back at a chart post-session and find the largest and smoothest price swings. And then analyse the entry point to find the obvious way to get into that trade.

Followed shortly after by calling ourselves all kinds of names for having missed such a blindingly obvious entry. And then vowing to never make such a newbie error again.

Let's try it with this trade…

You can't catch them all

You can't catch them all

You can't catch them all

But it's not like that.

Trades look different at the hard right edge of the screen.

Here is the same missed trade from a different perspective, looking back at some earlier structure and positioning the entry point at the right-hand side.

You can't catch them all

You can't catch them all

You can't catch them all

You can't catch them all

I'm ok with missing this trade. I feel my assessment at the hard right edge was reasonable. I accept that you can't catch them all. And this is simply one that was not mine to catch. Hopefully you were able to catch it and profit from the whole move.

YES… we must review our charts post-session.

And it's very important to review the strongly directional price swings that were missed.

But make sure that the primary part of this review occurs at the hard right-hand edge of the screen.

Is it really something you should have caught? Or are you influenced by the hindsight view of the trade outcome?

Because the simple fact is….

as much as you'd love to…

You can't catch them all.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Reviewing Key Price Action Sequences

A great way to learn to read price action is to review your historical price charts, with a focus on the price action at key structural locations.

Find and review anything which fits these categories.

  • tests of significant levels
  • breaks of significant levels
  • traps
  • transitions between trends and ranges
  • transitions from volatility contraction to expansion
  • and in fact anything else that stands out on the chart

 

Each day, identify a key price sequence.

Study it and learn.

It only takes a minute.

Let's look at an example in which Crude Oil breaks higher in Monday's session, into layered levels of range resistance, before falling back into the range.

(more…)

Post-Session Chart Review

We recently shared some post-trade reviews from Josh, who is doing exceptional work in creating a trade review journal for his longer timeframe forex trading (daily charts).

See the trade reviews here if you missed them: http://www.yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/Trade-Review-Examples/

But a trade review journal is not the only option you have.

Today I'd like to share a chart that came to me with some email Q&A, from Greg, who also operates in the forex markets but on much shorter timeframes.

What I like about this is the fact that Greg produces a chart like this after EVERY session. He keeps them in a personal blog; but you could do the same via any journaling application or even printouts stored in a binder. 

Greg displays the trading timeframe chart overlayed with the following information:

  • Key support and resistance levels

  • One or two key price action or market structure observations (eg. something that stands out with regards strength / weakness analysis, traps or price interaction with key levels)

  • Setup opportunity (with a hindsight bias)

(more…)

Trade Review Examples

The following trade review examples have been taken (with permission) from some email conversations with Josh, a trader of the YTC Price Action Trader methodology.

He's still in the early stages of his development, developing confidence in his strategy and processes through historical chart review. He's doing this using ForexTester software which allows for trading of historical charts as if it were a live market environment.

Josh has been making tremendous progress. The two most recent months results were as follows:

March:

  • 25 trades
  • 16 winners
  • 9 losers
  • Average win: $249.42
  • Average loss: $141.94
  • win%: 64%
  • win/loss size ratio: 1.75 : 1

April:

  • 13 trades
  • 9 winners
  • 4 losers
  • Average win: $401.72
  • Average loss: $190.28
  • win%: 69%
  • win/loss size ratio: 2.11 : 1

In both cases the win percentage is really healthy. And the winners are significantly larger than the losers. Too many people over-analyse their individual loses in attempt to avoid them in future. By all means analyse them and improve your knowledge and skill. But accept as well that you'll always have losses. And as long as you manage them, as Josh has been doing (ensuring they're cut short and that the winners are held for larger profits) then the losses are quite acceptable.

What is not to love about those stats. Josh has a great edge here… evidenced as well by the nicely rising equity curves for each month, and the distribution graph showing larger bars on the winning size (also included in his email but not shown here).

This is great trading.

My advice to him: Continue exactly as he's been going.Set this as his benchmark (or even set slightly worse) and continue from here aiming for consistency in results. If he can maintain this approximate performance for another 18 hindsight based months, I'd want to then see him transition to forward testing. (Note: a month of hindsight based trading using forextester does NOT take a month… just in case you were worried about how long this might take!)

But that's not the point of this article!

Rather, I want to talk about a key part of the process that Josh used to get to this point.

(more…)

How Could I Have Analysed This Better?

Here's an example of someone who's coming along quite nicely with their development as a trader.

The following two images are from a YTC Price Action Trader reader who sent an email, asking the following:

I'm not sure if this method of thinking can be used to go against my premise in the future? What I was really wanting to see was a spring bear trap to go long.

Thank you Lance

B.M.

reader analysis - image 1

(more…)

What is Market Replay?

Recent articles on my session review process mentioned the use of a market replay feature. I’ve been asked for some information on this tool. Not surprising really – it’s something that most forex traders will not have experienced.

Market replay is a feature that has appeared on many futures platforms in recent years.

It allows you to replay the trading session in a simulated environment. Price bars appear tick by tick, exactly as they did when trading live.

It will typically offer controls, as displayed below for play, pause and fast-forward, as well as a slide control to move to any particular chart time period.

We are also able to re-enter and manage trades all over again, this time in a simulated environment.

This is an ideal tool for implementing deliberate practice methods of learning.

(more…)

My Post-Session Routine – Reader Tips

I’d like to share an email provided by a YTC-newsletter reader, Alex, in response to the recent article on post-session analysis. In this email, Alex presents a method he used to improve his trading through effective post-session analysis and review. All effective review involves (in my opinion) some form of comparison of actual performance with hindsight performance. Alex offers a great technique for achieving this aim.

Thanks Alex… Great stuff.

Email extract…

I would like to share an element of post-session analysis which I came up with by accident (many good things happen that way, e.g. 3M sticky notes ūüėČ

I am usually printing out unmarked candlestick charts at the end of the day, cover them with a blank sheet, and uncover bar by bar, marking my analysis and entries. I would then mark my trade management decisions too (moving SL and taking (partial) exits or making add-ons to the position. One day I printed, by mistake, 3 copies of the same chart. I used one for the analysis on that day; the other two copies were left on the table. A few days later, I printed "fresh" (then current) charts out and put them on the table on top of those extra "leftover" copies from a few days earlier.

I then started doing my bar-by-bar analysis, and at the end of it thought that some charts looked familiar. It was then that I realized that there were some old charts in that batch. Out of curiosity, I compared freshly marked chart with my analysis of the same chart which I made a few days earlier. I was surprised to see that only a half of the setups on both charts were "overlapping" (i.e. were marked in the same way). That made me think.

I started doing that as a deliberate exercise: print out 2-3 copies of a chart, do analysis on that day and keep the other copies for a few days, then analyze them again. Gradually, I realized that I can consistently mark certain types of setups. I decided to focus more on those setups as the ones I could recognize better. Gradually, I increased consistency of my analysis to about 70%. During that exercise, the most consistent setups were distilled and my trading is now centered around them.

With that trick my thought was (still is) – if I cannot achieve at least 70-75% consistency with identifying setups during a bar-by-bar analysis on a printed chart, how can I get it right with all the pressure of live trading.

Another trick to share: I grab a snapshot of each setup live (I use http://www.techsmith.com/jing/) to be able to review it at a "face value" – when you review trades post factum seeing how things indeed developed, it’s hard not to allow the "hindsight bias" to cloud your analysis. i.e. sometimes a setup looks bad with a hindsight, but makes perfect sense when taken – even great setups do fail from time to time.


My Post-Session Routine

 I operate my trading business in accordance with my Procedures Manual, which documents the procedural steps I will carry out in order to complete:

  • My pre-session routine

  • My during-session routine

  • My post-session routine

  • My contingency management procedures

We discussed the pre-session routine in a previous article –¬†http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/my-pre-session-routine/

In this article, I’d like to discuss my post-session routine. Feel free to use whatever parts you find useful for documenting your own routine. Feedback is always welcome. I love to hear how others manage their trading as well (through co-operation we can all improve as traders).

Post-session involves any trading work done after completion of the days trading session. This involves two main components:

  1. Immediately After

  2. Before Bed

 

Immediately After: (with additional comments or links in italics when clarification is required)

  1. Relaxation and Breathing Session (quick Р2 to 3 minutes max)

  2. Administration (approx 5 mins)

    1. Export transactions from broker

    2. Confirm my trade log matches the broker’s transactions

    3. Complete any post-session trading log and spreadsheet entries (usually little to do here, as this is completed during session when time is available)

    4. Print charts and mark the trades (usually completed during session, if it allows time)

    5. Review P&L

    6. Update calendar with Green/Red profit or loss indicator

  3. Trading Session Review (approx 45 mins+; document any significant findings in the Trading Log under the heading TS Review)

    1. Market Environment Review

      1. With hindsight, how would you define the market environment?

      2. How successful were you in identifying the market environment during the trading session?

      3. What signs were present to indicate this environment?

      4. What key pattern features were present and how could they have been used to identify the market trend and bias?

      5. Step manually through the chart bar by bar, or use a market replay feature to step through the chart at high speed, observing the market environment and the signals that identify that environment, trend and bias.

      6. Print the chart and add appropriate notes to your Market Structure Journal. 

    2. Trades Taken

      1. With the benefit of hindsight, was your trade based on a valid setup for that market environment?

      2. If this was a valid trade:

        1. Review the signals that led you to identify the trade opportunity?

        2. What was the ideal entry point? How does that compare to your entry? What signals (if any) did the market provide, which could have led to an improved entry?

        3. Was the initial stop location appropriate? Was it in accordance with your trading plan? Where, with the benefit of hindsight, should the stop have been placed? What signals (if any) did the market provide to identify that location?

        4. What was the optimal trade management strategy, in order to minimize risk when wrong or maximize gain when right? How does that compare to your trade management strategy? What signals (if any) did the market provide for moving the stop to breakeven, or beyond?

        5. What was the optimal exit location or locations, in order to minimize risk when wrong or maximize gain when right? How does this compare to your exit location? What signals (if any) did the market provide to identify this ideal exit location?

      3. If this was not a valid trade:

        1. What signals were present that should have led you to avoid that trade?

        2. Having got into the trade, was the initial stop location appropriate? Was it in accordance with my trading plan? Where, with the benefit of hindsight, should the stop have been placed? What signals (if any) did the market provide to identify that location?

        3. What was the optimal way to manage this trade, in order to minimize risk when wrong or maximize gain when right? How does that compare to your trade management strategy? What signals (if any) did the market provide for moving the stop to breakeven, or beyond?

        4. What was the optimal exit location or locations, in order to minimize risk when wrong or maximize gain when right? How does this compare to your exit location? What signals (if any) did the market provide to identify this ideal exit location?

      4. Replay that portion of the trading session, making optimal decisions for valid trades and avoiding invalid trades, either by stepping manually through the chart bar by bar, or use a market replay feature. 

    3. Trades Missed

      1. With the benefit of hindsight, where were the valid trade opportunities that were missed?

      2. For each of these trade opportunities:

        1. What signals did the market provide that should have alerted me to the trade setup?

        2. What was the ideal entry point? What signals (if any) did the market provide, which could have led to identify this ideal entry?

        3. Where, with the benefit of hindsight, should the stop have been placed? What signals (if any) did the market provide to identify that location?

        4. What was the optimal trade management strategy, in order to minimize risk when wrong or maximize gain when right? What signals (if any) did the market provide for moving the stop to breakeven, or beyond?

        5. What was the optimal exit location or locations, in order to minimize risk when wrong or maximize gain when right? What signals (if any) did the market provide to identify these ideal exit locations?

      3. Replay the trade, making optimal decisions, either by stepping manually through the chart bar by bar, or use a market replay feature. 

    4. Summarise this session’s performance in the trading log.

  4. Physical and Psychological Performance Review (approx 2-3 mins; document any observations in my trading log under the heading Perf Review)

    1. Were my fatigue levels appropriately managed?

    2. Was I in optimal physical condition? What can I do to improve?

    3. Was my ability to sustain focus at an acceptable level? What can I do to improve?

    4. Was I accepting of emotion during the trading session, without letting it unduly influence decision making? What can I do to improve?

    5. Was my mental state during trade execution one of confidence and self-belief, or one of fear? Why? What can I do to improve?

    6. Am I satisfied with my performance during this trading session? What can I do to improve?

    7. Do I feel I am making progress in my trading performance from day to day? What can I improve?

    8. Write summary notes.

  5. Next Session Preparation (approx 2 to 3 mins; document in my trading log under the heading Next Session)

    1. Document any goals for the next session (process goals, not outcome) 

  6. Final Relaxation and Breathing Session (quick Р2 to 3 minutes max)

  7. Completely let go of whatever happened during the trading session

 

Before Bed:

  1. Relaxation and Breathing Session (quick Р2 to 3 minutes max)

  2. Visualisation of success – achievement of my outcome goals

  3. Completely let go of whatever happened during the day

 

That’s it. Nice & simple. With experience it will typically take around 60 mins. You don’t need to sim replay EVERY trade (although if you have time then that would be great). I’d suggest sticking to just those that offer the most learning potential, and could have been managed better. In fact, run through them several times if you can, for maximum benefit.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs.

 

P.S. For an example of the Trade Review part of this process, see the previous articles here: