Tag Archives: Setup

Traps Just Before RTH Open – 4

 

Traps immediately before the open… we've discussed them a number of times over the last year.

Here are some of the previous discussions, if you missed them:

 

And you'll probably find a few more examples if you scroll back through the social media feeds.

The thing is though – the market keeps presenting us with this great opportunity. And they do say that repetition is the mother of all learning. So let's look at another example, from last Monday.

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

From a YTC Price Action Trader perspective, it's simply a first PB in a new trend. But as the last image states – it was caught because I recognised the trap before RTH open, which had me primed, ready and waiting for the opportunity LONG.

Trades like this ONLY happen because of my Market Structure & Price Action (MSPA) Journal. If you don't have one, then I highly recommend you start. Every day – make at least one entry into the journal. Find something interesting within either the structure of the chart, or the way price moves, and document it.

Over time, you'll start to notice repetition of ideas.

And that is where you find opportunity.

Study them inside and out. Set up rules or guidelines for ways to exploit that opportunity. Implement, test and develop.

Today's article gives you two areas of exploration, in starting your own MSPA Journal.

(1) Traps before (or immediately after) RTH Open.

(2) Opening Momentum Drives.

If you follow me on social media, you will recall the following two posts in recent weeks:

<image: Opening Drive Study>

<image: Opening Drive Study>

Well now you have a third opening drive to study. And I promise you the market will provide more.

This is the path to learning.

Every day – find something interesting. Document it. Study it. And then when you start to see repetition of ideas – dig deeper and find a way to exploit that opportunity.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Traps Just Before RTH Open – 3

 

This has been a favourite topic of mine throughout the last year. We explored the idea here and here, along with a bunch of other examples on social media.

But then the market just keeps providing more examples.

So let's look one more time.

The general concept is a trap that occurs through failure of a significant break, very late in the pre-session market and just before RTH Open (RTH = Regular Trading Hours; ie. the pit session).

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

Our most recent example fits in the second category – a break to new overnight highs, failing on or shortly after the session open, giving us opportunity to enter SHORT.

Let's begin… with the NQ 1 minute chart on Friday 15th November, 2019.

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

I've written a lot about displaying patience at the open. About waiting till the bias is clear and trading conditions are favourable.

But there are some situations where I don't display patience.

Where I'm keen to get a trade on as soon as I can.

No patience. No delays. It's game on!

One of these situations is when the market sets up a trap just before or just after the RTH Open.

Keep an eye out for similar opportunity in your own trading.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

One Winner One Loser

 

A question received last Monday: "Are you trading today? It's a holiday but the market is open."

For future readers… Monday was 11th November 2019. Veterans Day.

And yes, the economic calendar which I use also has this listed as a US holiday. But the market is definitely open all day (or at least the index futures which I trade).

Here's my plan for holidays, because as the question noted, there are different kinds of holidays:

  • Holidays where the market is closed – no trading!  (Duh!)
  • Holidays where the market is open for one of those "half day" sessions – no trading! I don't care if it does move. That's the low probability outcome. More likely it will be dull, lifeless, narrow range chop.
  • Holidays where the market is open all day – My preference is to avoid it, but if I've got nothing better to do then let the opening structure play out and then make an assessment.

 

I had nothing better to do. So I let the opening structure play out. And then assessed.

How much opening structure? There's no rule here. Make an judgment call as to how much is necessary to see if there is sufficient liquidity, pace, volatility etc.

If the market opens with a gap outside the prior day's range, and outside any higher timeframe congestion, I might be satisfied just with the opening TTF price swing, or just waiting a short time period like 5-15 minutes. Then assessing.

Or on days like today, where the market opened within the prior days range, I will wait a bit longer.

<image: One Winner One Loser>

 

I was completely comfortable with no trades. But if I could see edge, then let's play.

<image: One Winner One Loser>

<image: One Winner One Loser>

 

For readers of the YTC Price Action Trader – The Principle being applied here, and in fact the reason for the whole trade, should be obvious. If not, email me.

<image: One Winner One Loser>

<image: One Winner One Loser>

<image: One Winner One Loser>

<image: One Winner One Loser>

<image: One Winner One Loser>

<image: One Winner One Loser>

 

One winner. And one loser. Just a small day, but it is a "holiday" session and I'm happy with nothing.

Of great importance though – the loser is much smaller in size than the winner.

Which reminds me of one of the most important points I've shared over the years at YTC, accepting of course that a two trade sample size is way too small (but the concept is what is important)… what if you could be happy with a 50% win rate, and learn to profit from a positive Win/Loss Size Ratio?

Ok, so back to the main point of the article:

Here's my plan for holidays, because as the question noted, there are different kinds of holidays:

  • Holidays where the market is closed – no trading!  (Duh!)
  • Holidays where the market is open for one of those "half day" sessions – no trading! I don't care if it does move. That's the low probability outcome. More likely it will be dull, lifeless, narrow range chop.
  • Holidays where the market is open all day – My preference is to avoid it, but if I've got nothing better to do then let the opening structure play out and then make an assessment.

 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

It’s Game On! Let’s Trade!

 

I operate with three general levels of engagement – Trading, Trade with Caution, and Stand Aside.

Because not all conditions in the market are the same.

If you haven't done so, I highly recommend adopting a similar practice. Take some time to consider the factors that might trigger each level of engagement in your own trading business.

Today let's look at three factors which had me in "Trading" mode right at the market open. No delays. No hesitation.

With these three factors in play, I wanted to be in the first opportunity I could find.

<image: It's Game On! Let's Trade!>

<image: It's Game On! Let's Trade!>

<image: It's Game On! Let's Trade!>

A gap open, from a strong and persistent overnight uptrend, with a recent trap showing an inability to drop.

There is emotion in the market.

And I want to trade.

(See here for prior articles on traps just before the open – here and here).

<image: It's Game On! Let's Trade!>

(NB. YTC Price Action Trader concepts – The First Principle is in play, PB setup)

<image: It's Game On! Let's Trade!>

<image: It's Game On! Let's Trade!>

<image: It's Game On! Let's Trade!>

I don't want to trade all market opens.

There are many that I classify as "Trade with Caution". Think of the opposite of today's example – a market opening in the middle of the prior day's range, following a dull and lifeless sideways overnight session. There is no emotion driving the market. And so I have no business in taking a position until something changes. Wait patiently. Let the opening structure form (5 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes… or as long as it takes). And then trade off that structure.

But there are other days when I don't want to wait. Market sentiment appears to be strong and potentially one-sided. This is not a time to wait. This is not a time to "Trade with Caution".

Today was not one for waiting. It's game on. Let's trade.

Again, if you haven't done so, I highly recommend adopting a similar practice of classifying three general levels of engagement – Trading, Trade with Caution, and Stand Aside.

Take some time to consider the factors which might trigger each level of engagement in your own trading business.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Traps Just Before RTH Open – 2

 

A few months ago we examined the concept of traps occurring in the price action just before, or immediately after, the RTH Open (RTH = Regular Trading Hours).

I'll place links to the prior articles at the bottom of this one, if you want to review them.

Today, let's look at another example of a breakout very late in the pre-session market, just before the RTH Open.

This is something which I absolutely LOVE to see. Because if that breakout fails, then it often sets up quite favourable conditions from the open. And so I'm keen to get a trade on as soon as I can.

No patience. No delays. It's game on!

Here's the general concept:

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

This concept can be applied in any market which offers pre-session trading leading into a clearly defined "regular" day session. Spot forex traders might apply it at the UK open, or the US open.

Today's example set up a break of the overnight high. That is, the same concept as the second image above.

Let's start by looking at a higher timeframe chart, to get some wider context.

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

And the breakout on the Trading Timeframe chart:

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open>

<image: Traps just before RTH Open> 

I've written a lot about displaying patience at the open. About waiting till the bias is clear and trading conditions are favourable.

But there are some situations where I don't display patience.

Where I'm keen to get a trade on as soon as I can.

No patience. No delays. It's game on!

One of these situations is when the market sets up a trap just before or just after the RTH Open.

Keep an eye out for similar opportunity in your own trading.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 

Prior Articles:

Traps Just Before RTH Open – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/traps-just-before-rth-open/

Traps At The Open – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/traps-at-the-open/

Traps At The Open 2 – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/traps-at-the-open-2/

 


 

Targeting the Overnight High or Low – 2

 

Last week we discussed one of my current favourite plays for the first 30-60 minutes of the session – targeting the overnight high (ONH) or overnight low (ONL).

You can review last week's discussion here.

Just a few hours after sending out that email the market opened again. And the same concept played out once more. Let's check it out.

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

You don't have to manage your trades like this. It's just the way that makes most sense to me. If there is any threat of a trade moving into negative territory, I prefer to scratch it and reassess, rather than holding and hoping for it to recover.

Sometimes that works to my advantage. Other times it doesn't.

This method of trade management does require you to be completely comfortable with re-entering.

If you're not able to easily re-enter, you'll be better operating with a wider stop and a more passive set & forget style. On this particular day, your trade would have worked out fine.

Back to the trade…

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

As mentioned in the prior article, there is a very high probability that the overnight high or overnight low will be hit at some point during the session.

And a good probability that it will occur within the opening hour of the session.

I could give you stats for the last few months. But I'd rather you find them yourself. You'll learn more this way.

If it interests you, spend some time over the weekend to review the prior two to three months to get an idea of just how high these probabilities are.

And then monitor the concept in coming weeks in your own markets. Perhaps you'll also find the overnight high or overnight low provide nice targets for early trade opportunity.

Please realise though – this is NOT the setup. The concept we're discussing here is simply selection of a high probability target. Take whatever setups you normally take from the open. Manage risk as you normally would, because they won't all work. But when they do work, the fact that the target is backed by some really high probability stats, can make it quite easy to hold.

Sometimes they work really well:

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

But occasionally, not so well.

The very next day fails to reach both the ONH and ONL. If you held a trade for either of these targets, it would have fallen well short.

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Overnight Low>

There are NEVER certainties. No matter how high the probability, some targets will fall on the losing side of the stats. So manage risk, as per normal. And expect a challenge. If it hits the target quickly, as it sometimes will, consider it a bonus.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Targeting the Overnight High or Low

 

I've become rather fond of targeting either the overnight high (ONH) or overnight low (ONL) during early session trading.

If you're new to this idea, schedule some time to look back at the last few weeks of charts and take note of how many times they hit. For the ten sessions leading up to today's trading, nine sessions have hit either the ONH or ONL. Six of these occurring in the opening 30 minutes of the trading session. Seven within the opening hour.

So not only can we use the ONH/ONL as levels to trade off. But they also offer a price target for PB/CPB trade opportunity early in the session.

Of course, some happen too quickly to offer any opportunity. But otherwise, if the bias is clear and a valid setup is in place with sufficient room to the level, take the trade.

Let's start with a 30 minute chart to get some "bigger picture" context.

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

Dropping to the 1 minute trading timeframe:

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

<image: Targeting the Overnight High or Low>

Before you even consider looking for a trade entry, you need a target. You should have some sense of WHERE the market is going.

The ONH and ONL are two levels which I like to use as a price target in the opening 30-60 minutes of a session.

Have a look at recent sessions in your preferred markets. How many times has the market hit the ONH or ONL? How soon within the session?

Perhaps you'll also find they act as good initial price targets for early session trades.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Choose YOUR Playing Field

 

One of the most obvious changes in my own trading over the last decade is a willingness to take fewer trades.

It used to be that if there was a price swing… I wanted to trade it.

On the plus side this meant that I was there for everything that did move to good profits. But it also meant that I had to suffer through many sequences where the market went nowhere and the best I could hope for was to grind out a breakeven result.

Now, I'm quite content to let the market play without me. If I miss opportunity, so be it.

I don't need to trade everything that moves.

Instead, I aim to stick to the easier sequences. The times in the market that typically have greater range. And the places within the structure that are more likely to offer favourable conditions.

I choose MY playing field. And I play MY game. What the market does outside of this game, is of no concern at all.

Let's start by looking at a Higher Timeframe chart to get some context:

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

<image: Choose YOUR playing field>

You don't have to trade every price sequence.

Choose YOUR playing field.

And make sure you're playing YOUR game, not the markets.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Higher Quality Breakout Failure Trades

 

One of the aims of your journaling process is to build a collection of near textbook-perfect examples of each of your trade setups.

And from these, develop awareness of the factors which lead to increased odds of success.

Friday, 21st June, offered an absolutely beautiful Breakout Failure setup.

Let's start with a 5 minute chart to get some context:

<image: Higher Quality Breakout Failure Trades>

The important factor that I wish to highlight today is not where the trade occurred.

But rather – how price got there.

One of the key features I like to see, which suggests potentially increased odds of success, is price not only having to travel a long way to reach the level, but to have also STRETCHED to do so.

<image: Higher Quality Breakout Failure Trades>

Looking at the 1 minute chart (my preferred Trading Timeframe in this market):

<image: Higher Quality Breakout Failure Trades>

This is a Breakout Failure that I DO NOT want to miss.

Additional study for those with the YTC Price Action Trader:

<image: Higher Quality Breakout Failure Trades>

<image: Higher Quality Breakout Failure Trades>

<image: Higher Quality Breakout Failure Trades>

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs