Tag Archives: Trade Series

An Entry Mindset with a Whole Lot Less Fear

 

The whole analysis process for a novice trader is aimed towards finding a winning trade.

Sure, they know intellectually that not all trades will win.

But surely this one… the one they worked so hard for… the one that all their analysis says is a good trade… it's just got to win!

And then they enter the trade…

An Entry Mindset with a Whole Lot Less Fear

Gripped by the fear that comes with every tick of price movement, they increase the risk of mismanaging the trade. They increase the likelihood of underperforming. And they risk potential damage to their self-belief.

What if there was another way?

What if you had a different mindset?

What if you stopped trying to find winners?

An Entry Mindset with a Whole Lot Less Fear

An Entry Mindset with a Whole Lot Less Fear

An Entry Mindset with a Whole Lot Less Fear

That's a key difference.

A novice is trying to find a trade that will win.

I'm trying to find an entry that is worthy of being one of twenty.

I don't need a winner.

I place all the odds in my favour. And I take the trade.

An Entry Mindset with a Whole Lot Less Fear

This is an entry that is worthy of being one of 20 within the group.

It doesn't need to be a winner.

The whole group of 20 needs to win.

So this trade just needs to get me off to a good start – profiting if it can, and just minimising the damage if it can't.

A slightly different mindset…. but with a whole lot less fear.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Wrong Wrong Wrong Right

 

This was an interesting sequence of trades – three which I got completely wrong, followed by one which I finally got right.

The key takeaways:

  1. You won’t always get it right. Sometimes your timing is out. Other times, like in this sequence, your assessment of bias is just wrong.
  2. Good entry location and good active trade management can ensure that even when you get it wrong, you still don’t lose much. Or, as in this sequence, you don’t lose anything.
  3. One right trade can more than make up for numerous wrong trades.
  4. Profits come from a series of trades. Not from individual trades. In this business, individual trade results are irrelevant (assuming they do not break your money and risk management limits).

 

Market open

The plan

Wrong

Note importantly on the Trading Timeframe that the entry was very much near the low. There was absolutely NO waiting for confirmation of price moving higher. Instead, entry was taken when price showed it could not move lower.

Note also how active trade management allowed the trade to profit, with half taken off at the first target area and the remainder scratched for a smaller loss once it was clear this trade was wrong.

Good decision making with regards to entry and trade management ensured that I did not lose here, despite being wrong about the direction of the market.

Let's try again

Wrong

Again…

Note importantly on the Trading Timeframe that the entry was very much near the low. There was absolutely NO waiting for confirmation of price moving higher. Instead, entry was taken when price showed it could not move lower.

Note also how active trade management allowed the trade to profit, with some risk taken off when I wasn’t happy with the post-entry stall. This turned out premature, but it’s a good decision. Price should have moved quicker. Of the remainder of the position, half is taken off at the next stall area and the remainder scratched for a smaller loss once it was clear this trade was wrong.

Good decision making with regards to entry and trade management ensured that I did not lose here, despite being wrong about the direction of the market.

One more time... cause it's working so well so far!!!

Wrong

Yes, the temptation to not show bad trading is GREAT. But sometimes there are good lessons.

Once more for effect…

Note importantly on the Trading Timeframe that the entry was very much near the low. There was absolutely NO waiting for confirmation of price moving higher. Instead, entry was taken when price showed it could not move lower.

Note also how active trade management allowed the trade to profit, with some risk taken off early (in the area of the prior pullback lows) and the remainder scratched for a smaller loss once it was clear this trade was wrong.

Good decision making with regards to entry and trade management ensured that I did not lose here, despite being wrong about the direction of the market.

A better plan

Right

Repeating the key takeaways:

  1. You won’t always get it right. Sometimes your timing is out. Other times, like in this sequence, your assessment of bias is just wrong.
  2. Good entry location and good active trade management can ensure that even when you get it wrong, you still don’t lose much. Or, as in this sequence, you don’t lose anything.
  3. One right trade can more than make up for numerous wrong trades.
  4. Profits come from a series of trades. Not from individual trades. In this business, individual trade results are irrelevant (assuming they do not break your money and risk management limits).

 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

How to Kick-Start Your Growth and Development

 

If your progress has stalled in any way, it is just SO IMPORTANT to realise the following truth:

Progress comes from your growth and development plan, not from your strategy.

This just won't work:

The typical failed process

Hoping, wishing and praying doesn't work.

Just trying harder doesn't work.

You need something ACTIONABLE.

Let's fix it NOW:

STEP ONE: Implement a growth and development plan based upon GROUPS OF TRADES.

Here is the concept. Review the following articles:

(a)  http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/its-time-to-fight-to-get-to-the-next-level/ 

(b)  http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/its-time-to-fight-to-get-to-the-next-level-examples/

(c)  http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/you-can-do-this/

(d)  http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/consistency-its-a-necessary-part-of-the-process/

(e)  http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/before-making-changes-to-your-strategy/

A GROUP OF TRADES Growth and Development Process

Also… any changes you're making…  consider making them the stretch goal for your next group.

See here – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/stretching-to-the-next-level/

A stretch goal - just a little stretch beyond current capabilities

Most importantly, major process changes can only occur at the end of each group. And they must be based upon proper review and analysis of your group stats and journal entries.

STEP TWO: Intra-group, monitor daily to ensure consistent implementation of your process.

No major process changes occur here.

Only tweaks or minor changes to how you execute your processes.

A daily review to improve implementation of your processes

Now move the response to question three to tomorrow's pre-session planning.

Remember:

Progress comes from your growth and development plan, not from your strategy.

If you're not progressing, then something HAS TO CHANGE.

Something actionable.

Something concrete.

Between groups, you MUST identify a concrete, actionable improvement to process.

Within groups, you MUST monitor consistency in implementing process, and tweak as required to improve implementation.

Hoping, wishing and praying that somehow this time it will be different, doesn't work.

Just trying harder, doesn't work.

Find something REAL that you can implement.

It won't always be easy. In fact it will rarely be easy. But damn it, you can't progress by just continuing on the same treadmill.

Fight to find an actionable change that progresses you in the right direction. Implement it. Repeat.

You can do this, 

Lance Beggs

 


 

It is NOT your job to win on any particular trade!

 

Before you can consistently win, you're going to have to learn how to lose really well.

That is…

  • Completely accepting losses as a normal part of the game.
  • And containing the damage to pre-accepted limits.

 

This has been one of my favourite themes of the last year or so. Let's go over it one more time.

It really is that important!

Here's an extract from an email discussion I had on Wednesday with another trader in response to a really challenging sequence of price action.

(5) This point may not be a problem for you. You might understand it completely. But in my experience, while the vast majority of "developing" traders say they do understand this, the reality is that very few traders actually do REALLY GET it at a deeper level. Their actions and decisions prove they don't get it. And often when I'm sent an email asking "why didn't this trade win", it's obvious that this is the case – they don't really understand the game.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is your job to identify opportunity that contains edge. And to take it and manage it well. Some will win. Some will lose.

Our aim is not to profit on any particular trade. But rather to profit over a series of trades.

Feel free to define a "series of trades" based upon whatever number you consider provides a sufficient sample size. For the sake of this email, let's assume it's 20 trades, which is the absolute minimum I'd consider as sufficient.

So we aim to profit over 20 trade groupings. Within each group there will be some winners. There will be some losers. Both are absolutely fine. They're meant to be there.

And in fact, there will likely be strings of losers, from times when either the market environment was not optimal. Or our decision making was suboptimal.

Again, that is completely normal.

So our decision making pre-entry should be in confirming that (a) the trade idea has edge, and (b) regardless of whether it wins or loses, it's a trade that we really want contributing to our 20 trade sample.

And during the trade management stage, at the forefront of our mind is always the thought about whether or not we still want this contributing to our 20 trade sample.

The reason for bringing this up, is because the interaction with S/R that you have provided in your example, is rather messy. We don't know that will be the case until after the fact, when we can view the charts with the benefit of hindsight. But it's not unusual in messy price sequences to end up with two, or maybe even three losses or scratched trades. This is completely normal. And it should be absorbed within the 20 trade sample, with other better sequences providing sufficient profits to overcome them.

This is also why I will typically only limit myself to two attempts at a trade idea. Three at most (if the prior losses are less than 1R each). If after these 2-3 attempts, I've not captured a good entry, then I'm clearly not reading the market well. Stand aside. And wait for the structure to change. If one further entry would have been sufficient to capture the planned move, and it now occurs without me, so be it. It wasn't mine to catch. Let it go and move on to the next.

 This is VERY IMPORTANT. In fact, key to success. ALWAYS be thinking about the larger sample of trades. Is the current trade one you want contributing to the sample? And if it's one of the losers, keep it small so that it can be easily overcome. And if it's one of the winners, work to take as much out of it as you can.

 

There is no need to review the sequence from that email.

Let's instead look at a few trades in the first hour on Tuesday.

Trades in which there is nothing particularly special. They're just normal run-of-the-mill trades.

Some lose. Some win.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

Let's look at the two losses…

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

Here's the plan:

KEEP THE LOSSES SMALL.

CONTAIN THE DAMAGE.

SO THAT IT ONLY TAKES ONE OR TWO SMALL WINNERS TO MORE THAN MAKE UP FOR THEM.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

It is not your job to win on any particular trade.

Before you can consistently win, you're going to have to learn how to lose really well.

That is…

  • Completely accepting losses as a normal part of the game.
  • And containing the damage to pre-accepted limits.

 

Stop worrying about profiting on every single trade.

Aim instead to just manage them well.

And seek to profit over a larger SERIES of trades.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Before Making Changes to your Strategy, Ask These Questions…

 

We're one week into the new year. Are you already trying to tweak your strategy, or your trading process, based upon a bad session or two?

Before making changes to your strategy or process, ask yourself the following questions:

1. Is the change the result of deliberate analysis of past performance, in order to improve upon a recognised deficiency or to further enhance a current strength?

A Deliberate Process

2. Or is the change a result of looking at a few different indicators or settings and thinking, "This might be a good idea"?

I know it will work this time!

It better be the first one!

If not, the major problem is not with strategy, but with your growth and development process. Yes, the strategy may well need further work. But without an effective growth and development process you'll likely never find the right solution.

Let's fix it now.

First, review this article – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/dont-break-the-chain-a-simple-tool-to-improve-consistency/

We're going to use this method to try to force some consistency. But with a tracking sheet designed just for this purpose.

Right click to save a PDF copy

(Larger copy: http://www.yourtradingcoach.com/products/ebooks/consistency-tracker.pdf)

And second, commit to a better process.

Review this article – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-business/its-time-to-fight-to-get-to-the-next-level/

Print out the article if necessary.

And take action.

A Deliberate Process

Your trading success requires consistency in application of your plan… and an effective process for driving growth and development.

You can do it!

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

A 50% Win Rate IS Enough

 

I love this recent email exchange with a new trader…

Email received: (We'll come in mid-stream as the earlier conversation is not relevant to this article!)

Great Lance, thanks for responding and giving me all this information.

I plan on trading highly liquid stocks and probably the intraday with the occasional swing trade. I've been out of the market for a while so I am going through some of the reads you have recommended. Come Into My Trading Room is excellent.

My problem is that I need to fine tune my studies because what I think works ends up not 50% of the time.

I love how you explain things and looking forward to buying your strategies. Your emails are great also. Thanks Lance.

 

My response:

Thanks. I'm glad you're finding value in my writing.

You said, "My problem is that I need to fine tune my studies because what I think works ends up not 50% of the time."

Obviously I don't have an real insight into how you're trading. But here is a different way of thinking of the problem…

What if 50% winners was enough? What if you could work to capture more of the move in those that did win. And cut the losses quickly on those that lost.

That is, accepting 50/50 and profiting from a higher win/loss size ratio.

Seriously… 50% can be enough.

See here also: http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/stop-hoping-your-trade-will-win/

 

His response:

I have never thought of it in that way but now I will!!

 

Awesome! This is one of the many important breakthroughs that we need to achieve along our path to professional trading.

It's such a simple concept. But it's hard to see. In some ways it goes against our natural desire to win. And we're bombarded daily with advertising copy promoting high win percentage strategies.

But the fact is that long-term profitability is not just a function of our win rate. Just as important is the Win/Loss Size Ratio (WLSR).

  • WLSR = Average Win / Average Loss

 

If you achieve a 50% win rate across a series of trades you can still profit provided your average win is greater than your average loss.

In my own trading, the win rate is the least important of these trade statistics.

In a 20 trade sample I expect to achieve a win rate anywhere between 40 to 70 percent. But I aim to profit by keeping the average win greater than the average loss.

Yes… 50% can be enough.

50% winners across a whole month can be profitable, provided your average win is greater than your average loss.

50% winners across a whole year can be profitable, provided your average win is greater than your average loss.

50% winners across your career can be profitable, provided your average win is greater than your average loss.

Let's look at a few trades. Obviously eight trades are too small a sample size to really concern ourselves with the stats.

But it's eight trades that provided four wins and four losses.

And yet it profited.

Because the average win was greater than the average loss.

A 50 percent win rate is enough

A 50 percent win rate is enough

A 50 percent win rate is enough

A 50 percent win rate is enough

A 50 percent win rate is enough

A 50 percent win rate is enough

A 50 percent win rate is enough

A 50 percent win rate is enough

 

By all means, aim for as high a win rate as you can achieve.

But seriously… 50% can be enough.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 

PS. Note: This discussion has excluded consideration of commissions and other business expenses, as they will vary from trader to trader. Obviously while a series of trades may well be profitable in and of themselves, a business profit is only achieved if these trade profits are sufficient to overcome commissions and other expenses. But the fact remains, a 50% win rate will still be sufficient. You'll just need a slightly higher WLSR to cover these costs.

 


 

I Was Wrong Again

 

You won't be successful as a trader until you're comfortable with the idea of being wrong.

I'm wrong EVERY DAY.

Numerous times.

I'm ok with that.

And that's part of why I'm successful.

Trading success requires that you accept and understand that success...

comes over a series of trades.

Individual trades are irrelevant.

You will be wrong!

I was wrong again.

Part of the position was stopped out at -2.0 points; the rest was at -2.25 points.

Whatever!!!

I step aside.

I regroup.

And I return and do it right.

Because, you know what? One trade does not define the success or failure of my trading business.

A trading edge plays out over a SERIES OF TRADES.

Often!

It took me two more trades to get back in front.

One that almost did it… it's just the commissions that kept me in slight drawdown.

Accept it. And...

What was I saying before about "right but mismanaged"?

Thankfully there was opportunity to re-enter!

learn to profit despite your imperfection in decision making and trade execution.

Yep… playing The Fourth Principle would have worked out so much better.

But instead, I'm left with a whole lot of IMPERFECT DECISION MAKING!!!

And yet… that's reality.

I'd love to show you only the "perfect" trade sequences.

But that would be doing you a disservice.

Reality is sometimes messy. You need to accept that.

And you need to learn to profit DESPITE your imperfection.

So if you find yourself overly frustrated after a trade loss, and unable to get back in while the premise is still valid, ask yourself why?

Do you not believe in your edge?

Do you not believe in your ability to trade your edge?

Are you trading too much size, such that a single loss actually HURTS?

Or have you not yet truly understood and accepted the long-term nature of this business (aiming for positive results over a series of trades rather than on every single trade)?

You won't be successful as a trader until you're comfortable with the idea of being wrong.

I'm wrong EVERY DAY.

Numerous times.

I'm ok with that.

And that's part of why I'm successful.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Review and Improve

 

You might like to consider your review process as the vehicle which drives your trading business to its ultimate destination.

Whether that destination is ongoing improvement and eventual success… or continued mediocrity, frustration and failure… is completely up to you.

If you've got nothing in place, here is a simple process to get you started.

Once you're comfortable with this, there is great scope to expand it to new areas of review. It doesn't solve everything.

But again, if you've got nothing in place, consider implementing this process RIGHT NOW.

Review and Improve

Look at your last 20 trades. Study them with the benefit of hindsight.

Examine 50 if you prefer. Or 100. Find the right compromise for sample size, which is large enough to be statistically significant and small enough to ensure your review process occurs on a regular basis. But not less than 20. I would suggest that is the absolutely minimum.

Once you've gathered all the trade data and charts, let's check the quality of the setups.

How many of your trade ideas were in chart areas which DID offer potential for multiple-R profits (2R minimum)?

It doesn't matter whether you actually managed to profit, or not.

We're checking the general concept. The trade idea.

We're making sure you're trading in the right areas of the chart.

Did price move from the setup area a sufficient distance to provide multiple-R returns?

Take note of all the trades within the sample which achieved this goal. And now let's check the quality of trade entry.

Now consider those trades that were in good multiple-R setup areas. How many were you able to enter at a place and time which offered good potential to catch those multiple-R profits?

Again, it doesn't matter if you achieved a profit or a loss.

With the benefit of hindsight, given where you entered, is it reasonable to expect that a successful trader could manage that position to achieve multiple-R profits?

How many of these trades would you classify as having a good entry?

Take note of them… and let's move on to check the trade management.

Now consider those trades that were in good setup areas and which were entered well. How many of these were successfully held from entry to the first target level?

How many were you able to hold open to the initial target point, avoiding all temptation to scratch the position early?

And then…

Of those which did achieve the initial target, how many of these were held to a further "hindsight perfect" exit point?

Again, take note of how many achieved this aim.

And now let's use this information to drive our business forward.

Looking at these figures, which area do you need to improve when trading the next sample?

It's important that we focus on one area at a time.

And that we work in order.

Get the setups right first. Are you happy with the number of trade ideas that are actually providing multiple-R profit potential? If not… focus on improving the quality of your trade ideas.

Then work on entry.

Then initial management.

And then ongoing management.

Find the first area that disappoints you. Examine why. Determine a course of action for the next 20 trade sample.

And repeat.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

It’s Not About Being Right

 

One of the great things about being involved in trading education is that it provides me with the ability to chat with a LOT of developing traders.

Common themes appear over time. This is one of them…

"Can you review this trade. It's a trade idea which I thought was good, but it just didn't work out."

They want to know where they failed with their analysis or decision making. They want to know what they did wrong.

But often, there was nothing wrong with their analysis or decision making.

Here's the reality of this game – we won't always get it right.

But we don't have to.

That is not what this game is about.

I can understand it. We're wired that way. We like to win. We don't like to lose.

We like to be right in our analysis and trade decisions. We don't like to be wrong.

And there's a whole technical analysis and trading education industry out there, which promises to "show you how to find winning trades".

But that's not what this game is about.

It's not about being right.

Not EVERY TIME.

It's about profiting over a SERIES OF TRADES.

A series that includes both winning trades AND losing trades.

It's about ensuring that when you are right you take as much out of the market as you can. And when you're wrong you cut the loss as much and as quickly as you can. So that, when the whole series of trades is done, the end result is a profit.

Let's look at a very short series of trades from Wednesday night. It's a sequence in Crude Oil which occurred in the hour immediately following the Crude Oil Inventories report.

This is a very low timeframe. And it's high volatility, fast pace stuff. Don't be put off by that if you trade other markets, other timeframes, or in fact other strategies. The concept still applies. It's not about being right. It's about managing the winners and losers such that you profit over a series of trades.

In this sequence, EVERY TRADE ENTRY DECISION I MADE, EXCEPT ONE, WAS WRONG.

But it still provides a profit.

It's not about being right!

This was the only entry decision that actually worked out according to plan

Arrgggggh! Wrong direction!

Wrong!

Wrong!

And wrong again!

And yet the whole sequence shows a profit!

Stop trying to be right.

Instead, try to find the places on the chart where you can win bigger (when right) than you lose (when wrong).

It's only a slight shift in perspective. But it makes a massive difference in how you see this game.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 

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