Tag Archives: Traps

The Other Trader (6)

 

Let's continue with an old article series – the metagame – trading AGAINST other traders who find themselves on the wrong side of the market.

Because…

If I can't feel someone on the other side of the market getting it really wrong, there is no trade.

You can see the prior articles here if you missed them – OneTwoThreeFourFive.

Here is the general concept for today's trade…

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5> 

In playing the metagame, we aim to place ourselves in the mindset of any trader who bought late in the move, at or soon after the breakout. Feel their stress build as price stalls. And stalls. And stalls. Feel their pain as their "sure thing" collapses back below the stall region. And find a way to profit from their pain.

Yes, trading is a predatory game!

Let's see some charts.

We'll be seeking BOF Setup opportunity at this point here:

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

 

The key part I want to emphasise today is the following:

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6> 

 

Let's play the metagame and put ourselves in the mindset of those who entered LONG on the breakout.

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 6> 

 

Trading the metagame…

If I can't feel someone on the other side of the market getting it really wrong, there is no trade.

Let someone trap themselves in a low-probability position.

Place yourself into their mindset.

Feel their pain.

And when it gets to the point where they've lost all hope, STRIKE.

Go get 'em,

Lance Beggs

 


 

A Failed Break of One Side Leads to…

 

In preparing my daily entry for my Market Structure & Price Action Journal, I sometimes venture away from my usual market and timeframe if there is an example that REALLY catches my interest. This was one of them.

We're looking here at the Crude Oil 30 minute chart.

<image:A failed break of one side of a range will often lead to a test of the other side.>

Why did this interest me?

Because breaks from a structure like this can lead to some really nice trading opportunity.

<image:A failed break of one side of a range will often lead to a test of the other side.>

Sometimes!

But not always!

Sometimes the market will present me with one of my favourite rules of thumb. If you've been following me for a few years you will have no doubt heard this one before.

  • A failed break of one side of a range will often lead to a test of the other side.

 

<image:A failed break of one side of a range will often lead to a test of the other side.>

And that's exactly what we got the next day.

<image:A failed break of one side of a range will often lead to a test of the other side.>

Let's zoom in to the 3 and 1 minute charts and look at the price action from the session open.

<image:A failed break of one side of a range will often lead to a test of the other side.>

<image:A failed break of one side of a range will often lead to a test of the other side.>

I didn't trade this. It's not my current market. It's just a great example of one of my favourite rules-of-thumb, which caught my attention and made it into my Market Structure and Price Action Journal.

But have a look over the 3 Min TTF chart and the 1 Min LTF chart. See if you can identify the places you might have caught entry short.

In particular the BOF entry short from the top.

And keep an eye out for this scenario in your own markets.

  • A failed break of one side of a range will often lead to a test of the other side.

 

It may just provide some nice trading conditions as you profit from the move that occurs after the breakout traders are stopped out of their position.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

When Obvious Expectations Fail

 

Take note when the market offers something that many traders will see as obvious.

Because when "obvious expectations" fail, you will often find a clear directional bias and good trade opportunity in the opposite direction.

Monday 30th April 2018

<image: When obvious expectations fail>

And that is a quite reasonable expectation. You SHOULD be seeking opportunity LONG.

At least until the market proves otherwise.

For me though, I always take note of anything I consider to be an "obvious expectation". Because I also know that there is no certainty in the markets. And when obvious expectations fail, that often provides some of my favourite trading conditions in the other direction.

Let's zoom in to Monday's price action (it's the 5 min chart – a little higher than my trading timeframe but it fits the image better!)…

<image: When obvious expectations fail>

Tuesday 1st May 2018

Another example…

<image: When obvious expectations fail>

<image: When obvious expectations fail>

<image: When obvious expectations fail> 

Wednesday 2nd May 2018

And again…

<image: When obvious expectations fail>

<image: When obvious expectations fail> 

Take note when the market offers something that many traders will see as obvious.

Because when "obvious expectations" fail, you will often find a clear directional bias and good trade opportunity in the opposite direction.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour – 3

 

This is what I like to see in a breakout…

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour> 

This is a prime target for a breakout failure.

But I don't ever just jump in and fade the break.

There is never any certainty in this game. It may well rally.

Instead, I watch post-breakout behaviour and CONFIRM that there are no signs of strength.

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour> 

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour> 

Don't ever just jump in and fade the break.

There is never any certainty in this game. It may well rally.

Instead, watch post-breakout behaviour and CONFIRM that there are no signs of strength.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour – 2

 

This is what I like to see in a breakout…

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour> 

This is a prime target for a breakout failure.

But I don't ever just jump in and fade the break.

There is never any certainty in this game. It may well rally.

Instead, I watch post-breakout behaviour and CONFIRM that there are no signs of strength.

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour> 

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour> 

Don't ever just jump in and fade the break.

There is never any certainty in this game. It may well rally.

Instead, watch post-breakout behaviour and CONFIRM that there are no signs of strength.

Happy trading, 

Lance Beggs

 


 

Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour – 1

 

This is what I like to see in a breakout…

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour> 

This is a prime target for a breakout failure.

But I don't ever just jump in and fade the break.

There is never any certainty in this game. It may well rally.

Instead, I watch post-breakout behaviour and CONFIRM that there are no signs of strength.

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour> 

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour> 

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

<image: Watch Post-Breakout Behaviour>

Don't ever just jump in and fade the break.

There is never any certainty in this game. It may well rally.

Instead, watch post-breakout behaviour and CONFIRM that there are no signs of strength.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap

 

Last week we profited from recognising and exploiting a Higher Timeframe (HTF) trap. Check it out here if you missed it – http://yourtradingcoach.com/trading-process-and-strategy/higher-timeframe-trap-everyone-long-above-this-level-is-wrong/

This week, let's look at the other side of traps.

The fact that sometimes… the trapper becomes trapped.

<image: Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap>

<image: Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap>

<image: Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap>

<image: Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap>

<image: Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap>

<image: Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap>

<image: Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap>

<image: Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap>

<image: Caught on the Wrong Side of the HTF Trap>

Repeating for effect:

  • You don't always get it right.
  • Sometimes you're "the other trader" that's caught in the trap.
  • The key to surviving and minimising damage is in quickly recognising when price movement is NOT behaving as it should if the premise is correct.
  • Recognise and adapt.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Higher Timeframe Trap – Everyone Long Above This Level is WRONG!

 

Most of the traps I trade come from the Trading Timeframe or Lower Timeframe charts.

I don't watch the higher timeframe for traps.

However, I do see them from time to time. And they can provide some nice trading opportunity.

<image: Higher Timeframe Trap>

Ok, "wrong" is probably a poor choice of word. The reality is that we don't know their strategy and their timeframe.

But let's just say that they're in a drawdown.

And if they're operating on similar timeframes to us, their position is NOT looking good.

They'll likely be under a significant amount of stress. And probably hoping, wishing and praying for some way to get out of the position closer to breakeven.

Let's drop down to the Trading Timeframe chart to see where we currently stand.

<image: Higher Timeframe Trap>

<image: Higher Timeframe Trap>

<image: Higher Timeframe Trap>

<image: Higher Timeframe Trap>

From a Trading Timeframe perspective, this was simply a BPB of a sideways range boundary.

But from a wider context perspective, it was also triggering a trap on the higher timeframe chart. Those betting on a gap-open continuation higher suddenly found their trade premise threatened.

And this makes our range breakout SHORT just a whole lot sweeter.

It pays to always be asking, "Is anyone trapped?"

And while our focus should primarily be on the Trading Timeframe chart, we should ensure our scan also extends to the Higher Timeframe chart. At least once per new higher timeframe candle.

Maintain a feel for context. Where is the current price action occurring within the higher timeframe structure? Sometimes this wider situational awareness will keep you out of a bad trade. Other times, as here, it can add additional fuel to our trade idea.

Always be asking, "Is anyone trapped?"

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

The Other Trader (5)

 

Let's continue with a series we started last year – the metagame – trading AGAINST other traders who find themselves on the wrong side of the market.

Because…

If I can't feel someone on the other side of the market getting it really wrong, there is no trade.

You can see the prior articles here if you missed them – OneTwoThreeFour.

Let's set up the scenario…

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

(Source: YTC Price Action Trader Vol 2 Ch 3 P99-102)

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

(Source: YTC Price Action Trader Vol 2 Ch 3 P145-153)

From a metagame perspective, this is the scenario we're looking at. We aim to place ourselves in the mindset of any trader who bought late in the move, at or soon after the breakout. Feel their stress build as price stalls. And stalls. And stalls. Feel their pain as their "sure thing" collapses back below the stall region. And find a way to profit from their pain.

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5> 

Let's zoom in a bit. And take on the mindset of the novice retail trader who entered late in the move (let's say right on the break).

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

<image - metagame trading - the other trader 5>

Trading the metagame…

If I can't feel someone on the other side of the market getting it really wrong, there is no trade.

Fast, sudden price moves don't always continue.

Quite often, someone is getting trapped.

And that… is opportunity.

Go get 'em,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Let It Fail First – Then Get In

 

Although we trade very differently, I am quite a fan of Al Brooks first book, "Reading Price Charts Bar by Bar".

One of his quotes which has stuck with me over the years is the following:

  • Countertrend setups in strong trends almost always fail and become great With Trend setups.

 

This quote came to mind earlier in the week, as I took a counter-trend entry against a strong trend, despite my predominant thought prior to entry being "This is too obvious. It has to be a trap!".

<Let it fail first - then get in>

The drop from point 2 was just over 30pts (120 ticks) in 15 minutes. Ok, it's maybe not the strongest trend. But there was very little opportunity in the way of pullback entries SHORT. And bears still felt in control.

<Let it fail first - then get in>

<Let it fail first - then get in>

<Let it fail first - then get in> 

And that's when the Al Brooks quote came to mind.

  • Countertrend setups in strong trends almost always fail and become great With Trend setups.

 

<Let it fail first - then get in>

The outcome:

<Let it fail first - then get in>

<Let it fail first - then get in>

<Let it fail first - then get in> 

Happy trading, 

Lance Beggs