About: Lance Beggs

YourTradingCoach - Admin

Recent Posts by Lance Beggs

When the Trap Entry is itself a Trap

 

Let's start by viewing the market right as it opens:

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

Readers of the YTC Price Action Trader have several principles they use for projecting the upcoming price swings and identifying areas of potential trade opportunity.

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

BUT WAIT!

There is something else that should be jumping out at you as relevant as well.

Something that we have discussed numerous times over the last couple of years.

That's right – it's a trap RIGHT BEFORE the regular session open.

See here if you missed the prior articles:

 

Here is the general idea:

<image: Traps Just Before RTH Open>

This is a feature of the open, long recognised through my daily Market Structure & Price Action Journal practice.

Traps just before the open can often provide nice follow-through, when the breakout fails in the opening price sequence.

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

Wait!

What?

Why not today?

Because there is a price action feature that suggests the trap is itself potentially a trap.

It's IMPORTANT to look at the area the trap is moving into.

While normally I only put minor weighting on overnight price structure, there are some times it offers clear warning signs.

Like this:

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

Let's move forward and see the outcome.

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

<image: When the trap entry is itself a trap>

A break of a significant level just immediately prior to the RTH open, or immediately after the open, should have you considering the potential for trap-driven opportunity. But just pause for a second and check the context. Does the pre-open structure provide a potential barrier to movement? The trap concept will still apply. However you might just need to widen the area and hold off on entry, until the barrier is also broken.

Because otherwise, you might find that the trap you're seeking to trade is itself a trap!

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Sometimes It Takes Multiple Attempts – 2

 

Tuesday's trade sequence reminded me of this article from last year – Sometimes It Takes Multiple Attempts.

Where the market reminds us that it doesn't give a damn about our expectations for a quick move from entry to the target.

And that sometimes, it would rather play a bit first and see if it can stop us out. 

<image: Higher Timeframe Context> 

I just love these narrow range holiday sessions. They provide a good "line in the sand" from which we can determine bigger-picture sentiment – bullish above and bearish below.

So yes, despite the low volume I do consider them relevant enough to mark on my charts as S/R. 

And so, prior to the session open, I sent out the following social media post. Please note that this is a repeat of a 2019 post so the price action is different to today's action. But it's the concept that is relevant.

<image: Question - Do I use the narrow range holiday sessions as SR?> 

So here's the plan today:

<image: The Trading Plan> 

<image: The Trading Plan> 

Sounds easy, right?

Let's drop now to the 1 minute Trading Timeframe:

<image: Sometimes it takes multiple attempts>

<image: Sometimes it takes multiple attempts>

<image: Sometimes it takes multiple attempts>

<image: Sometimes it takes multiple attempts>

<image: Sometimes it takes multiple attempts>

<image: Sometimes it takes multiple attempts>

<image: Sometimes it takes multiple attempts>

<image: Sometimes it takes multiple attempts>

<image: Sometimes it takes multiple attempts> 

A few thoughts post-session:

(a) It's unrealistic to expect that every trade will go immediately to your target. Sometimes a trade idea will require multiple attempts.

(b) Two failures – stop and reassess. Reconsider the original trade premise, but also be sure to consider the idea that you are completely wrong. And also that maybe you have no idea of what is happening and need to stand aside.

(c) Three failures – time out. Wait for a change of structure and only then look for the next trade idea.

(d) And maybe… consider the idea that a key goal in your trading should be to not only know how to find quality trade ideas, but also to get good at surviving those times when the trade idea doesn't quite match what the market is actually offering.

Because sometimes… it takes multiple attempts!

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

When the Pullback Hits Harder than Expected

 

Pullbacks… a simple retracement structure depicted in textbooks as smooth flowing and simple to read.

Reality though, is usually not so kind.

Far too often these pullbacks will be a mess. Full of chop, false-starts and stop-outs. Or unexpected and sudden shifts in pace or volatility.

Price action seemingly designed to confuse you and cause you to react emotionally and impulsively. Tempting you to enter too early and stop out. Or hesitate and miss the entry entirely.

In time, with experience, you'll improve your ability to read the market. And your ability to perceive edge.

And develop some rules-of-thumb for how to best manage these situations, when it seems the market is putting up a fight.

Let's look at one example of a rule, which guides me through a pullback that hits harder than expected.

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

<image: Pullback Entry Timing>

When the pullback hits harder than expected – step aside.

Don't be tempted to chase the first entry. If it v-turns and you miss the trade, let it go. It wasn't yours to catch.

The far better option is to wait for a second push lower and reassess.

Consider whether or not this rule might add value to your trading.

And then when you're comfortable with this, see if you can expand your skill level to find the exceptions to the rule. Those times and places where you might take that first entry. Because they exist as well.

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Until it Breaks and Holds, Exercise Extreme Caution!

 

This image was posted on social media recently, to highlight the way that the opening range can help minimise early damage to your P&L.

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

I received a message in response to the post:

This has me curious. Did you trade it? Can you show us the trades? If you did stand aside, at what point did you know to stop?

I did take two trades. Neither went to the targets as planned, but active trade management meant I was not in drawdown. I'm happy with both trades. They were the right decision.

I then stood aside and waited for the break.

So let's look back at the market and discuss my decision making. In particular, when I "called" price as stuck in the opening range. And when I stood aside.

Because it's rarely obvious that there will be opening range chop, until after the fact. And quite often it's only obvious after we've taken a loss or two.

As we work through this price sequence, it might be helpful to think of me as transitioning through three stages:

1. Fully engaged in the price action right from the open. Ready to react to any potential early trade opportunity, should the market drive with strength.

2. Recognising a chop-zone, with price stuck in the opening range, but still allowing limited engagement.

3. Recognising a chop-zone, and standing aside because I see greater potential for damage than profits.

Let's look at the market and work our way from stage 1 through to stage 3.

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

Adding to a Position

 

From time to time I get asked how I add to positions. That is, entering a new trade while the prior trade is still open.

So I thought it might be a good idea to outline my response here. Then I can just link straight to the article in future. (Time management WINNER!)

The plan is nice & easy. Because this is not something I do very often.

<image: Adding to a Position> 

Ok… not always… sometimes I will hold a partial position for a larger move. But mostly that is how I operate. It's how my trading has evolved over time.

All in, scale out.

Wait for the next one.

If you wish to chase larger trends and hold through multiple price swings and retracements, pyramiding into a larger position with numerous entries along the way, then you should seek guidance elsewhere. It's not a part of my plan.

But still… I do add on the rare occasion.

So here's how it works.

Pre-conditions:

  • The existing trade MUST be in profit.
  • The existing trail exit MUST be in a position such that even if both trades stop out immediately, I will still profit overall from the combined sequence. Or at least not lose!
  • And most importantly, the added position MUST be a valid trade in its own right.

 

That last point is critical for me. The added trade MUST be one that I would want to take, even if I missed the original entry. 

Let's look at an example.

<image: Adding to a Position> 

<image: Adding to a Position>

<image: Adding to a Position>

<image: Adding to a Position>

<image: Adding to a Position>

<image: Adding to a Position>

<image: Adding to a Position>

<image: Adding to a Position>

You won't see many examples on my site, where I have added to an existing position.

But all of them will (or should) have the following in common:

  • The existing trade MUST be in profit.
  • The existing trail exit MUST be in a position such that even if both trades stop out immediately, I will still profit overall from the combined sequence. Or at least not lose!
  • And most importantly, the added position MUST be a valid trade in its own right.

 

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs