This image was posted on social media recently, to highlight the way that the opening range can help minimise early damage to your P&L.

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

I received a message in response to the post:

This has me curious. Did you trade it? Can you show us the trades? If you did stand aside, at what point did you know to stop?

I did take two trades. Neither went to the targets as planned, but active trade management meant I was not in drawdown. I'm happy with both trades. They were the right decision.

I then stood aside and waited for the break.

So let's look back at the market and discuss my decision making. In particular, when I "called" price as stuck in the opening range. And when I stood aside.

Because it's rarely obvious that there will be opening range chop, until after the fact. And quite often it's only obvious after we've taken a loss or two.

As we work through this price sequence, it might be helpful to think of me as transitioning through three stages:

1. Fully engaged in the price action right from the open. Ready to react to any potential early trade opportunity, should the market drive with strength.

2. Recognising a chop-zone, with price stuck in the opening range, but still allowing limited engagement.

3. Recognising a chop-zone, and standing aside because I see greater potential for damage than profits.

Let's look at the market and work our way from stage 1 through to stage 3.

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

<image: Using the opening range to minimse damage in unfavourable opening conditions>

Happy trading,

Lance Beggs

 


 

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